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Skeptical Inquirer

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Skeptical Inquirer is the official journal of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. It is published by the Center for Inquiry in association with the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. Six times per year Skeptical Inquirer publishes critical scientific evaluations of all manner of controversial and extraordinary claims, including but not limited to paranormal and fringe-science matters, and informed discussion of all relevant issues. In addition to news, articles, book reviews, and investigations on a wide variety of topics, Skeptical Inquirer has a stellar stable of regular columnists including Joe Nickell (“Investigative Files”), Massimo Polidoro (“Notes on a Strange World”), Massimo Pigluicci (“Thinking About Science”), and SI managing editor Benjamin Radford's reader-driven (“The Skeptical Inquiree”). Yale University neurologist Steven Novella, M.D., founder of the New England Skeptical Society and executive editor of the Science-Based Medicine blog, contributes a new "The Science of Medicine" column, and contributing editor Kenneth W. Krause adds a regular science column, "ScienceWatch."

The Dangerous Delusion about Vaccines and Autism

The Dangerous Delusion about Vaccines and Autism

by James Randi
Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

A Magician in the Lab

We’re already seeing a comeback of measles due to drops in vaccination rates.

Mystery of the Paulding Light

Mystery of the Paulding Light

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

Skeptical Inquiree

Of course, it’s more fun to imagine the distant glimmer is a ghostly railroad brakeman’s phantom lantern than the headlights of a 2005 Honda Civic.

What Ghosts Mean

What Ghosts Mean

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

Review

“I have to admit that I’ve come to envy the people who reported having poltergeists in their home; they have a ready explanation for anything amiss in their household”

Public Debate, Scientific Skepticism, and Science Denial

by Stephan Lewandowsky, Michael E. Mann, Nicholas J.l. Brown, and Harris L. Friedman
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Feature

How can scientists navigate highly polarized public controversies and how can the public’s legitimate demand for involvement be accommodated without compromising the integrity of science?

Science vs. Silliness for Parents: Debunking the Myths of Child Psychology

Science vs. Silliness for Parents: Debunking the Myths of Child Psychology

by Stephen Hupp, Amanda Stary, and Jeremy Jewell
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Feature

Parents and students struggle to distinguish between pseudoscience and evidence-based ideas in child psychology. This study sampled the beliefs of 163 students and 205 parents on topics related to parenting and development.

Skepticism, at Heart, Is Not Partisan

by Craig A. Foster
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Commentary

Skeptics cannot support political claims that are simply at odds with reasonable interpretations of the existing evidence. However, they should, when speaking as skeptics, stop short of denigrating an entire political viewpoint.

Survey Shows Americans Fear Ghosts, the Government, and Each Other

Survey Shows Americans Fear Ghosts, the Government, and Each Other

by Carrie Poppy
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Special Report

The issues of paranormal and conspiracy claims, which have long been the focus of our work at Skeptical Inquirer, are finding new, interesting connections with these broader issues of how fear—especially irrational fear—works.

Claims of Chi: Besting a Tai Chi Master

Claims of Chi: Besting a Tai Chi Master

by Joe Nickell
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Investigative Files

Tai chi is a shortened form of taiji quan, “Supreme ultimate boxing.” Conceived centuries ago as a martial art, it is now also practiced—as “Taoist tai chi”—as an exercise technique…

Ten Practical Tactics to Unravel the Uncanny

by Massimo Polidoro
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Notes on a Strange World

The plural of anecdote is not evidence.

The Superbug Crisis: False Beliefs about Antibiotics Are a Global Threat

The Superbug Crisis: False Beliefs about Antibiotics Are a Global Threat

by Matt Nisbet
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

The Science of Science Communication

Each year at least 2 million Americans battle serious bacterial infections that are resistant to one or more antibiotics, and at least 23,000 die annually as a direct result of those infections.

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