More Options

Skeptical Inquirer

Subscribe | Order One Issue | Subscribe (Digital)

Skeptical Inquirer is the official journal of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. It is published by the Center for Inquiry in association with the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. Six times per year Skeptical Inquirer publishes critical scientific evaluations of all manner of controversial and extraordinary claims, including but not limited to paranormal and fringe-science matters, and informed discussion of all relevant issues. In addition to news, articles, book reviews, and investigations on a wide variety of topics, Skeptical Inquirer has a stellar stable of regular columnists including Joe Nickell (“Investigative Files”), Massimo Polidoro (“Notes on a Strange World”), Massimo Pigluicci (“Thinking About Science”), and SI managing editor Benjamin Radford's reader-driven (“The Skeptical Inquiree”). Yale University neurologist Steven Novella, M.D., founder of the New England Skeptical Society and executive editor of the Science-Based Medicine blog, contributes a new "The Science of Medicine" column, and contributing editor Kenneth W. Krause adds a regular science column, "ScienceWatch."

Before Carl Sagan and Neil deGrasse Tyson, There Was Dan Q. Posin

Before Carl Sagan and Neil deGrasse Tyson, There Was Dan Q. Posin

by Stuart Vyse
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

Pioneer physicist and science popularizer Dan Q. Posin saw the power of television for education and inspiration. Almost lost to history, his history has new relevance today.

Moving Science’s Statistical Goalposts

Moving Science’s Statistical Goalposts

by Stuart Vyse
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

In 1989, Ralph Rosnow and Robert Rosenthal, two well-respected experts on statistical methods in psychology, wrote the following memorable line: “We want to underscore that, surely, God loves the .06 nearly as much as the .05”. For researchers in psychology, this was an amusing statement.

Bigfoot as Big Myth: Seven Phases of Mythmaking

Bigfoot as Big Myth: Seven Phases of Mythmaking

by Joe Nickell
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Feature

The hairy man-beast known as the “Sasquatch” or “Bigfoot” is now ever present in North American culture. Supposedly a throwback to our evolutionary past, it is an “ape-man” version of us just as the little-bodied, big-headed, humanoid extraterrestrial is a futuristic one.

A Consistently Erroneous Technology

A Consistently Erroneous Technology

by James Randi
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

A Magician in the Lab

The evidence is just so much against this technology, it’s difficult to believe how long it has existed as a supposedly valid notion.

Evolution in the College Classroom: Facilitating Conversations about Science and Religion

Evolution in the College Classroom: Facilitating Conversations about Science and Religion

by Matt Nisbet
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

The Science of Science Communication

As surprising as this might sound, the unfortunate reality is that in many high schools across the country evolution is often avoided or covered superficially as part of a crammed science curriculum, taught by teachers who are underqualified and poorly supported.

Teaching Skepticism: How Early Can We Begin?

Teaching Skepticism: How Early Can We Begin?

by Scott O. Lilienfeld
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Special Report

I trust that I need not persuade readers of Skeptical Inquirer that in today’s world of post-truth, alternative facts, and rampant pseudoscience, critical thinking—reasoning that helps to compensate for our biases—is needed now more than ever.

A Brilliant Climate Collaboration

A Brilliant Climate Collaboration

by Robert Ladendorf
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Review

The Madhouse Effect: How Climate Change Denial Is Threatening Our Planet, Destroying Our Politics, and Driving Us Crazy by Michael E. Mann and Tom Toles

Predatory Journals: Write, Submit, and Publish the Next Day

Predatory Journals: Write, Submit, and Publish the Next Day

by Ramzi Hakami
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Special Report

Predatory journals can be defined as “publications [that take] large fees without providing robust editorial or publishing services.” They usually “recruit articles through aggressive marketing and spam emails, promising quick review and open access publication for a price.

The Politicization of Scientific Issues

The Politicization of Scientific Issues

by Jeanne Goldberg
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Feature

It is paradoxical that in populations supportive of science and democracy scientific issues have become politicized to the degree that objective evidence is ignored or rejected in favor of “alternative” opinions.

The Fakery of Electrodermal Screening

The Fakery of Electrodermal Screening

by Stephen Barrett
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Feature

Souped-up galvanometers are being used to assess people’s health and determine what they supposedly need. Tests expose them as preposterous, and government agencies should stop their use.

Page 1 of 88 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »