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Skeptical Inquirer

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Skeptical Inquirer is the official journal of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. It is published by the Center for Inquiry in association with the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. Six times per year Skeptical Inquirer publishes critical scientific evaluations of all manner of controversial and extraordinary claims, including but not limited to paranormal and fringe-science matters, and informed discussion of all relevant issues. In addition to news, articles, book reviews, and investigations on a wide variety of topics, Skeptical Inquirer has a stellar stable of regular columnists including Joe Nickell (“Investigative Files”), Massimo Polidoro (“Notes on a Strange World”), Massimo Pigluicci (“Thinking About Science”), and SI managing editor Benjamin Radford's reader-driven (“The Skeptical Inquiree”). Yale University neurologist Steven Novella, M.D., founder of the New England Skeptical Society and executive editor of the Science-Based Medicine blog, contributes a new "The Science of Medicine" column, and contributing editor Kenneth W. Krause adds a regular science column, "ScienceWatch."

Pizzagate and Beyond: Using Social Research to Understand Conspiracy Legends

Pizzagate and Beyond: Using Social Research to Understand Conspiracy Legends

by Jeffrey S. Debies-Carl
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

Conspiracy Theories and Incredible Tales

It is tempting to dismiss events such as last year’s “Pizzagate” shooting as the work of disturbed or unintelligent people, but social research provides an opportunity to explain the seemingly absurd episode and perhaps help avert future tragedies.

Becoming Fantastic: Why Some People Embellish Their Already Accomplished Lives with Incredible Tales

Becoming Fantastic: Why Some People Embellish Their Already Accomplished Lives with Incredible Tales

by Eric Wojciechowski
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

Conspiracy Theories and Incredible Tales

To increase excitement into what is perceived as a normal, uneventful life, some people create their own personal myths of adventure and accomplishment. These are not just exaggerations of real events, and such narratives can be in the realm of the fantastic.

Ten Questions (and Answers) about Teaching Evolution

Ten Questions (and Answers) about Teaching Evolution

by Bertha Vazquez and Christopher Freidhoff
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

Feature

A high school biology teacher asked the Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason & Science (a division of the Center for Inquiry) a series of questions about teaching evolution. Bertha Vazquez, director the foundation’s Teacher Institute for Evolutionary Science (TIES), answered.

Critical Thinking and Parenting: How Skepticism Saved My Special Needs Kid From Certain Death

Critical Thinking and Parenting: How Skepticism Saved My Special Needs Kid From Certain Death

by Amy Frushour Kelly
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

Feature

You are a skeptic, and your child has autism. How do you react?

Hollywood Curse Legends

Hollywood Curse Legends

by Brett Taylor
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

Feature

There are many myths behind movie lore concerning jinxes and mysterious deaths, but a closer look reveals these curses to be attributable more to publicity and rumor than to the supernatural.

The Roswell Incident at 70: Facts, Not Myths

The Roswell Incident at 70: Facts, Not Myths

by Kendrick Frazier
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

Special Report

The seventieth anniversary of the so-called Roswell Incident came and went this past summer with a refreshing lack of fuss.

Una tecnología consistentemente errónea

Una tecnología consistentemente errónea

by James Randi, translated by Alejandro Borgo
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

A Magician in the Lab

Un ilusionista en el laboratorio

Before Carl Sagan and Neil deGrasse Tyson, There Was Dan Q. Posin

Before Carl Sagan and Neil deGrasse Tyson, There Was Dan Q. Posin

by Stuart Vyse
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

Pioneer physicist and science popularizer Dan Q. Posin saw the power of television for education and inspiration. Almost lost to history, his history has new relevance today.

Moving Science’s Statistical Goalposts

Moving Science’s Statistical Goalposts

by Stuart Vyse
Volume 41.6, November/December 2017

In 1989, Ralph Rosnow and Robert Rosenthal, two well-respected experts on statistical methods in psychology, wrote the following memorable line: “We want to underscore that, surely, God loves the .06 nearly as much as the .05”. For researchers in psychology, this was an amusing statement.

Bigfoot as Big Myth: Seven Phases of Mythmaking

Bigfoot as Big Myth: Seven Phases of Mythmaking

by Joe Nickell
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Feature

The hairy man-beast known as the “Sasquatch” or “Bigfoot” is now ever present in North American culture. Supposedly a throwback to our evolutionary past, it is an “ape-man” version of us just as the little-bodied, big-headed, humanoid extraterrestrial is a futuristic one.

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