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Skeptical Inquirer — Feature

Bigfoot as Big Myth: Seven Phases of Mythmaking

Bigfoot as Big Myth: Seven Phases of Mythmaking

by Joe Nickell
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Feature

The hairy man-beast known as the “Sasquatch” or “Bigfoot” is now ever present in North American culture. Supposedly a throwback to our evolutionary past, it is an “ape-man” version of us just as the little-bodied, big-headed, humanoid extraterrestrial is a futuristic one.

The Politicization of Scientific Issues

The Politicization of Scientific Issues

by Jeanne Goldberg
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Feature

It is paradoxical that in populations supportive of science and democracy scientific issues have become politicized to the degree that objective evidence is ignored or rejected in favor of “alternative” opinions.

The Fakery of Electrodermal Screening

The Fakery of Electrodermal Screening

by Stephen Barrett
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Feature

Souped-up galvanometers are being used to assess people’s health and determine what they supposedly need. Tests expose them as preposterous, and government agencies should stop their use.

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The Fallacy Fork

by Maarten Boudry
Volume 41.5, September/October 2017

Feature

Why It’s Time to Get Rid of Fallacy Theory

Fire-Breathing Dinosaurs?

Fire-Breathing Dinosaurs?

by Philip J. Senter
Volume 41.4, July/August 2017

Feature

To support their claim that humans and dinosaurs coexisted, numerous antievolution publications—including grade-school science textbooks—assert that dragon legends were inspired by human encounters with fire-breathing dinosaurs. Here’s why that’s unrealistic.

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Did Australia’s Aborigines See Plesiosaurs? Yes–in a Children’s Book

by Philip J. Senter
Volume 41.4, July/August 2017

Feature

Surviving the Misinformation Age

Surviving the Misinformation Age

by David J. Helfand
Volume 41.3, May/June 2017

Feature

For ourselves and our society, survival in the current era requires adopting scientific habits of mind.

Statin Denialism

Statin Denialism

by Harriet Hall
Volume 41.3, May/June 2017

Feature

The benefits of statins far outweigh their risks, but public perception has been skewed by alarmist misinformation from statin denialists.

Vaccines, Autism, and the Promotion of Irrelevant Research: A Science-Pseudoscience Analysis

by Craig A. Foster and Sarenna M. Ortiz
Volume 41.3, May/June 2017

Feature

Proponents of the vaccination-autism link have created a bogus scientific debate by providing lists of studies that supposedly support their claims but are actually either questionable or irrelevant. We identify this as a relatively new pseudoscience tactic: the promotion of irrelevant research.

Why Skepticism?

by Ronald A. Lindsay
Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

Feature

The issues we address are only “soft” targets in the sense that there may be little scientific support for some of these claims. But these claims actually can be very resilient because of ideological support or commercial interests.

The Selfish Gene Revisited

The Selfish Gene Revisited

by Richard Dawkins
Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

Feature

On the fortieth anniversary of the book that made him a scientific celebrity, biologist Richard Dawkins looks back at this “gene’s eye view” of evolution and finds it even more relevant today.

God’s Own Medicine

God’s Own Medicine

by Paul Offit
Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

Feature

History’s unlearned lesson about pain relievers and addiction.

The Virtuous Skeptic

The Virtuous Skeptic

by Massimo Pigliucci
Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

Feature

Shouldn’t Skeptics Know What They Are Talking about When They Are Talking about It?

Why We Believe —Long After We Shouldn’t

by Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson
Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

Feature

Our brains are wired for self-justification and dissonance-reduction. We can override that impulse by learning how to admit our mistakes and separate them from our self-esteem.

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Helping Teachers Teach Evolution in the United States

by Bertha Vazquez
Volume 41.3, May/June 2017

Feature

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Everything You Know about Being Rh-Negative Is Wrong

by D. Ellen K. Tarr
Volume 41.3, May/June 2017

Feature

Public Debate, Scientific Skepticism, and Science Denial

by Stephan Lewandowsky, Michael E. Mann, Nicholas J.l. Brown, and Harris L. Friedman
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Feature

How can scientists navigate highly polarized public controversies and how can the public’s legitimate demand for involvement be accommodated without compromising the integrity of science?

Science vs. Silliness for Parents: Debunking the Myths of Child Psychology

Science vs. Silliness for Parents: Debunking the Myths of Child Psychology

by Stephen Hupp, Amanda Stary, and Jeremy Jewell
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Feature

Parents and students struggle to distinguish between pseudoscience and evidence-based ideas in child psychology. This study sampled the beliefs of 163 students and 205 parents on topics related to parenting and development.

Activismo escéptico de abajo hacia arriba

by Michael Marshall, translated by Alexandro Borgo.
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

La desventaja inevitable que tiene un movimiento sin sede central es la falta de un representante para manejar el activismo y dirigir el entusiasmo en actividades eficaces contra la pseudociencia, mientras que los grupos locales concentran sus energías en las actividades locales.

Cómo me involucré en el mundo escéptico

by Susan Gerbic, translated by Alejandro Borgo
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

Yo era extremadamente crédula e ingenua. No tenía a quién preguntarle y la Guerra Fría estaba en su esplendor.

Bigfoot and I: Reflections on Forty Years of Skepticism

Bigfoot and I: Reflections on Forty Years of Skepticism

by Eugenie Scott
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

Every physical anthropologist secretly wishes that Yeti and Bigfoot were real.

My Personal Odyssey in Skepticism

My Personal Odyssey in Skepticism

by Harriet Hall
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

It changed my life. I had already rejected religion after reading atheist writings, but I was still open to belief in UFOs, ESP, and all sorts of other weird things, simply because I had never come across anyone who questioned those beliefs.

From Tiny Acorns…

From Tiny Acorns…

by Christopher C. French
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

Back in the early 1980s, I believed in quite a number of paranormal claims. In my defense, back then skeptical critiques of parapsychology were even rarer than they are now, and all the books I used in preparing the lecture were uncritically pro-paranormal.

Spreading Skepticism

by Wendy M. Grossman
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

This goes to the heart of what, for me, skepticism is about: things we can test.

A Glimpse Backward—and Forward—at Skepticism’s Big Tent

A Glimpse Backward—and Forward—at Skepticism’s Big Tent

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

I have yet to have a person name an occupation or hobby that doesn’t have some angle into pseudoscience or paranormal claims.

How I Got Hooked on the Skeptical World

by Susan Gerbic
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

I was extremely gullible and naive, had no one to ask, and the Cold War was in full swing.

The Day the World Changed . . . for Me

The Day the World Changed . . . for Me

by Richard Saunders
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

When I was twelve years old, UFOs were real.

Skeptical Activism from the Bottom Up

by Michael Marshall
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

The inevitable downside to a movement with no center is a lack of a figurehead to drive activism and direct enthusiasm into effective pursuits, meaning opportunities to counter pseudoscience directly and publicly sometimes pass by, with local groups focusing their energies on their own local activities.

Promote Reason, Prevent Climate Catastrophes: Let’s Get ’Er Done

by Bill Nye
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

We must employ critical thinking and our powers of reason to recognize the problems of global climate change, play the hand we are being dealt, and get to work.

What Science Is and How and Why It Works

by Neil deGrasse Tyson
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

“Do whatever it takes to avoid fooling yourself into thinking something is true that is not, or that something is not true that is.”

Why Skepticism?

by Steven Novella
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

I have come to understand that scientific skepticism is a weird beast that is often difficult to understand, especially from the outside.

Science and Skepticism

Science and Skepticism

by Lawrence M. Krauss
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

These are the times that try men’s souls.” This was true when Thomas Paine uttered these words, and they remain true today.

How Can Skepticism Do Better?

by Scott O. Lilienfeld
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

We must begin to develop more effective means of disseminating the fruits of our labors to individuals who are skeptical of our skepticism.

Authority and Skepticism

by Daniel C. Dennett
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

One of the unwelcome side effects of the mostly wonderful democratization of knowledge that has been ushered in by the age of the Internet is that we are losing consensus on what to consult when settling a bet.

Stem Cell Research: Still Embattled after All These Years

Stem Cell Research: Still Embattled after All These Years

by Raymond Barglow and Margret Schaefer
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Feature

Had stem-cell research received the political support that it merits, it would probably have arrived by now at effective treatments for a number of severe chronic diseases.

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Creationism in Europe

by Stefaan Blancke
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Feature

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Project Greenglow: How Horizon Lost the Message in the Medium

by John Eades
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Feature

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No Time for Certainty

by Alan J. Scott
Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Feature

Does Astrology Need to Be True? A Thirty-Year Update

Does Astrology Need to Be True? A Thirty-Year Update

by Geoffrey Dean
Volume 40.4, July/August 2016

Feature

Thirty years ago, although dozens of tests had been mostly negative, astrologers said critics had ignored serious astrology. Now there are hundreds of tests, some of them even heroic. Has anything changed?

A Skeptical Response to Science Denial

A Skeptical Response to Science Denial

by John Cook
Volume 40.4, July/August 2016

Feature

Science denial has a corrosive effect on deli- cately understood scientific concepts, and it is getting worse. But science itself holds an answer.

Creators of the Paranormal

Creators of the Paranormal

by Joe Nickell
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

Feature

A handful of twentieth-century figures “created” the modern concept of the paranormal and its leading topics, transporting fantasy, myth, or speculation into a kind of believable “reality.” Most proved to be a chimera.

Dissociation and Paranormal Beliefs, Toward a Taxonomy of Belief in the Unreal

Dissociation and Paranormal Beliefs, Toward a Taxonomy of Belief in the Unreal

by Matthew J. Sharps, Schuyler W. Liao, and Megan R. Herrera
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

Feature

In a normal population, dissociative tendencies contribute to many types of 
paranormal thinking. Psychological dissociation, even at a subclinical level, is an important 
factor in the cognitive processing that leads to belief in the unreal.

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Nuclear Power and the Psychology of Evaluating Risk

by Daniel A. Vogel
Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Feature

Scientific Reasoning at the USAF Academy: An Examination into Titanium-Treated Necklaces

Scientific Reasoning at the USAF Academy: An Examination into Titanium-Treated Necklaces

by Craig A. Foster, Christopher K, McClernon, and Richard F. Reich
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

Feature

We used a classroom experiment at the United States Air Force Academy to examine whether 
necklaces infused with microscopic-particle titanium, such as those sold by Phiten Corporation, 
improve emotional well-being.

Stick It In Your Ear! How Not To Do Science

Stick It In Your Ear! How Not To Do Science

by Harriet Hall
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

Feature

Ear acupuncture claims to relieve sore throats. A new study seeming to support that idea is so poorly done that it provides a textbook example of how to distinguish between good and bad science.

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Time to Upgrade the Skeptical Operating System. Reboot.

by Sharon Hill
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

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Why I Am Optimistic about the Future of Skepticism

by Richard Wiseman
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

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The Better Angels of Our Nature vs. the Internet

by David J. Helfand
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

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Skepticism Evolves—and So Does the Paranormal

by Martin Bridgstock
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

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Alternative Medicine Is a Playground for Apologists

by Edzard Ernst
Volume 40.5, September/October 2016

Feature

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Does E = mc2 Imply Mysticism?

by Sadri Hassani
Volume 40.4, July/August 2016

Feature

No word stolen from physics is (ab)used in the woo literature more than energy. The most fa- mous equation in physics is often cited as proof that matter and soul are one and the same, a tenet of mysticism.

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Does the Universe Revolve around Me?

by Matthew P. Wiesner
Volume 40.4, July/August 2016

Feature

A Critical Review of the Geocentrism Documentary The Principle

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The Do’s and Don’ts of Trusting Science

by Faye Flam
Volume 40.4, July/August 2016

Feature

A Numerate Life

A Numerate Life

by John Allen Paulos
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

Feature

The man who brought us Innumeracy and touted the benefits of mathematical thinking 
begins his ‘anti-memoir’ by conveying concerns and questions we should have about 
biographies... or our own lives.

Biological Race and the Problem of Human Diversity

Biological Race and the Problem of Human Diversity

by Kenneth W. Krause
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

Feature

Is biological race a mere myth or a troublesome fact better left unexplored?

Mistaken Memories of Vampires: Pseudohistories of the Chupacabra

Mistaken Memories of Vampires: Pseudohistories of the Chupacabra

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

As well-known monsters go, the chupacabra is of very recent vintage, first appearing in 1995. However, some writers have created pseudohistories and claimed a false antiquity for the Hispanic vampire beast. These examples provide a fascinating look at cryptozoological folklore in the making.

Deepak Chopra’s ‘Physics’

Deepak Chopra’s ‘Physics’

by Sadri Hassani
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

Deepak Chopra attempts to connect fundamental concepts of physics to consciousness and spirituality. He started (ab)using physics with his book Quantum Healing. But does he pass the first test of a true scientist: professional integrity?

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A Testament of Belief Masquerading as Science

by Michael J. Reynolds
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

Feature

Need there be a conflict between science and religion? Francis S. Collins thinks not, but his "evidence for belief" disintegrates under scrutiny, revealing instead a personal testament of belief.

The ‘Lie Detector’ Test Revisited: A Great Example of Junk Science

The ‘Lie Detector’ Test Revisited: A Great Example of Junk Science

by Morton E. Tavel
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

Although the polygraph can be useful in coercing confessions, it is based on scientifically implausible assumptions of accuracy and is biased against the innocent. The scientific community justly considers it pseudoscience, and it should be abandoned.

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Skepticism and the Nature of the Mind

by Daniel A. Vogel
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

Feature

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The Mote in Thy Brother’s Eye

by Thomas Gilovich and Lee Ross
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

Feature

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Does the Scientific Method Have Biblical Origins?

by Brian Bolton
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

Feature

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Trends in Scientific Knowledge, Education, and Religion

by Charles S. Reichardt
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

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The Science of Meaning

by Gleb Tsipursky
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

‘Post-Materialist’ Science? A Smokescreen for Woo

‘Post-Materialist’ Science? A Smokescreen for Woo

by Sadri Hassani
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

Pseudoscience has been rapidly gaining ground in the past few decades. Dietary supplements and homeopathic preparations, advertised by the disgraced Dr. Oz and his ilk, now constitute a multi-billion-dollar industry.

The 1848 ‘Enormous Serpent’ of the Daedalus Identified

The 1848 ‘Enormous Serpent’ of the Daedalus Identified

by Gary J. Galbreath
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

A famous sea serpent sighting has been an enduring mystery 
of the sea since 1848. However, new information suggests a solution.

Encouraging Evidence-Free Enterprise: Business on a Bed of Sand

Encouraging Evidence-Free Enterprise: Business on a Bed of Sand

by Brian D. Engler and Eugenie V. Mielczarek
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

The former National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine’s use of two U.S. government grant programs for small businesses is examined and found to lend legitimacy to the lucrative business of non-evidence-based medicine.

A Brief History of Scientific Celebrity

A Brief History of Scientific Celebrity

by Declan Fahy
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

Science is personified by a handful of articulate, media-savvy scientists who stimulate new thinking, 
drive scientific controversies, enhance public understanding, mobilize social movements, 
and shape policy. To millions, these scientific celebrities are the public face of science.

Covert Cognition: My So-Called Near-Death Experience

Covert Cognition: My So-Called Near-Death Experience

by Stephanie Savage​
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

A skeptic sees no light at the end of the tunnel when she falls into a six-week coma and nearly dies.

ADVERLYING: Disliking Advertising from an Informed Perspective

ADVERLYING: Disliking Advertising from an Informed Perspective

by Steve Cuno
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

Some accusations levied against advertising are undeserved. But then, some are deserved, though perhaps not in ways you may have heard or assumed. Meanwhile, not a few bad apples engage in a heinous advertising tactic that goes largely unnoticed.

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Do We Really Want to Believe in UFOs?

by Klaus Brasch
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

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Treemonisha: Scott Joplin’s Skeptical Black Opera

by Bruce A. Thyer
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

When Don’t the Highly Educated Believe in Evolution? The Bible Believers Effect

When Don’t the Highly Educated Believe in Evolution? The Bible Believers Effect

by Charles S. Reichardt and Ian A. Saari
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Feature

Among those who believe the Bible is the word of God, those with more formal education are less likely to believe in human evolution than those with less education.

Alien Lights? At Phoenix, Stephenville, and Elsewhere: A Postmortem

Alien Lights? At Phoenix, Stephenville, and Elsewhere: A Postmortem

by James McGaha and Joe Nickell
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Feature

Investigations show that famous nighttime “alien light” sightings were all due to objects in the sky, but not the extraterrestrial spacecraft UFO enthusiasts imagined.

Why Do People Believe in Gods?

Why Do People Believe in Gods?

by Gary M. Bakker
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Feature

… And Ghosts, Angels, Demons, Fairies, Goblins, and Other Imagined Conspiracies?

Crazy Beliefs, Sane Believers: Toward a Cognitive Psychology of Conspiracy Ideation

Crazy Beliefs, Sane Believers: Toward a Cognitive Psychology of Conspiracy Ideation

by Preston R. Bost
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Feature

Where do conspiracy beliefs come from? Recent behavioral research suggests that they do not reflect pathology or lazy thinking but may instead come from normal, rational minds.

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Evolution: The Big and the Small of It

by Edouard Harris and Jérémie Harris
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Feature

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Yes, But How Do You Explain This?

by Stephen Carey
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Feature

Defending Science-Based Medicine: 44 Doctor-Bashing Arguments ...and Their Rebuttals

Defending Science-Based Medicine: 44 Doctor-Bashing Arguments ...and Their Rebuttals

by Harriet Hall
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

Supporters of alternative medicine and purveyors of quack remedies love to criticize conventional medicine and science. They keep repeating the same tired arguments that are easily rebutted. This handy guide will help skeptics answer common criticisms from doctor-bashers.

Sweet Science of Seduction or Scam? Evaluating eHarmony

Sweet Science of Seduction or Scam? Evaluating eHarmony

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

The popular online dating site eHarmony claims that its matching methods are both successful and scientific. But a closer look at the evidence suggests otherwise.

Video Game Violence and Pseudoscience: Bad Science, Fear, and Politics

Video Game Violence and Pseudoscience: Bad Science, Fear, and Politics

by Christopher J. Ferguson
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

Research continues to find that violent video games play a negligible role in societal violence. But the politics of a culture war won’t let the idea go.

Dr. Phil and the Hummingbird

Dr. Phil and the Hummingbird

by Jim Underdown
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

A medium made a seemingly impressive guess about a hummingbird on a national television talk show. A follow-up investigation finds it not so striking after all—for the birds, in fact.

Some Popular Global Warming Factoids

by John Eades
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

Norman Mailer coined the word factoids to describe facts that have no existence before appearing in a magazine or newspaper, but once they do appear they are accepted without question. Some global warming deniers are especially fond of them.

Remembrance of Apocalypse Past: The Psychology of True Believers When Nothing Happens

Remembrance of Apocalypse Past: The Psychology of True Believers When Nothing Happens

by Matthew J. Sharps, Schuyler W. Liao, and Megan R. Herrera
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

Research on belief in the 2012 “apocalypse” demonstrates that specific psychological processes contributed directly to the maintenance of paranormal apocalyptic beliefs, even after the apocalypse did not occur.

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Modern Geocentrism: A Case Study of Pseudoscience in Astronomy

by Matthew P. Wiesner
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Feature

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Flaw and Order: The Science and Mythology of Criminal Profiling

by Laurence Miller
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Feature

Josh Zepps with Ann Druyan: Cosmos, Carl Sagan, and Culture

Josh Zepps with Ann Druyan: Cosmos, Carl Sagan, and Culture

by Josh Zepps
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

We present a condensed version of an earlier interview about Ann Druyan’s experience with the first and the new Cosmos series by Josh Zepps for our Center for Inquiry’s Point of Inquiry podcast.

The Rhetoric of Extraordinary Claim

The Rhetoric of Extraordinary Claim

by Peter J. Marston
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

Although unfamiliar to many skeptics, rhetorical analysis can provide a useful complement to the traditional critical thinking approaches that comprise the “skeptic’s toolbox.”

An Introduction to Homeopathy

An Introduction to Homeopathy

by Harriet Hall
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

A brief guide to a popular alternative system of remedies based on a nineteenth-century concept that has no scientific validity.

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Kendrick Frazier Asks Ann Druyan about the New Cosmos

by Kendrick Frazier
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

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Runaway Hysteria: The Toyota Panic, with the Federal Government’s Seal of Approval

by Michael Fumento
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

Mount Rainier: ‘Saucer Magnet’

Mount Rainier: ‘Saucer Magnet’

by James McGaha and Joe Nickell
Volume 38.3, May/June 2014

Feature

Mount Rainier isn’t just where seminal UFO figure Kenneth Arnold saw “flying saucers” in 1947; the majestic mountain actually plays a more direct role in saucerology.

Selling Pseudoscience: A Rent in the Fabric of American Medicine

Selling Pseudoscience: A Rent in the Fabric of American Medicine

by Eugenie V. Mielczarek and Brian D. Engler
Volume 38.3, May/June 2014

Feature

A study of federal funding advancing naturopathy, acupuncture, chiropractic, and energy healing as acceptable medical protocols finds troubling misuse of taxpayer dollars.

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Stop Heisenberg Abuse! Three Outrageous Misappropriations of Quantum Physics

by Dale DeBakcsy
Volume 38.3, May/June 2014

Feature

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UFOs and Cognitive Science: A Case Study

by Matthew J. Sharps
Volume 38.3, May/June 2014

Feature

Stanislaw Burzynski: Four Decades of an Unproven Cancer Cure

Stanislaw Burzynski: Four Decades of an Unproven Cancer Cure

by David H. Gorski
Volume 38.2, March/April 2014

Feature

The Houston doctor Stanislaw Burzynski has been using an unproven cancer cure, “antineoplastons,” for decades, but despite its lack of proven anticancer activity, he has still not been shut down. Here is a primer for skeptics on his career and claims.

Skeptic Activists Fighting for Burzynski’s Cancer Patients

Skeptic Activists Fighting for Burzynski’s Cancer Patients

by Robert Blaskiewicz
Volume 38.2, March/April 2014

Feature

A group of skeptical activists has been aggressively investigating and challenging the false claims of the Burzynski clinic and its dubious cancer treatments, presenting reliable information about them online. They even raised funds for a legitimate research hospital.

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What Is the Danger That Terrorists Will Attack the United States with a Nuclear or ‘Dirty’ Bomb?

by Richard E. Wackrow
Volume 38.2, March/April 2014

Feature

The Moon Was Full and Nothing Happened

The Moon Was Full and Nothing Happened

by I. W. Kelly, James Rotton, and Roger Culver
Volume 10.2, Winter 1985-86

Feature

A Review of Studies on the Moon and Human Behavior and Lunar Beliefs

Harun Yahya’s Islamic Creationism: What It Is and Isn’t

Harun Yahya’s Islamic Creationism: What It Is and Isn’t

by Stefano Bigliardi
Volume 38.1, January/February 2014

Feature

The works published under the name Harun Yahya promote “Islamic creationism.” A closer look at their internal logic reveals that their appeal lies in their capacity to mimic science.