Bitter(s) Medicine

Bitter(s) Medicine

by Joe Nickell
Skeptical Briefs · Investigative Files · Volume 25.1

Bitters bottles are a window into an earlier era of quackery (although sometimes perhaps well-intentioned), as well as into the related worlds of unbridled advertising, liquor sales and consumption, and, of course, the very human need for relief from myriad ailments.

Online Tools for Skeptical Fact Checking

Online Tools for Skeptical Fact Checking

by Tamar Wilner
Special Articles
August 24, 2015

While we’re arguably awash in more misinformation than ever before, online media have also enabled tools and sources that help us evaluate dubious claims.

Myths about Nutrition

Myths about Nutrition

by Felipe Nogueira
Skeptical Briefs · Skepticism and Science · Volume 25.1

As a PhD student in medical sciences, people often ask me questions about diet and nutrition. The problem is that several bogus claims have spread and are widely believed.

Do Essential Oils Cure Everything?

Do Essential Oils Cure Everything?

by Carrie Poppy
Special Articles · Poppycock
August 13, 2015

My understanding of essentially oils was essentially (sorry) that they were concentrated versions of various smelly things: lavender, eucalyptus, rose. And that aromatherapy enthusiasts used different smells to evoke different emotions or mental states. But aromatherapy turns out to be only a small part of the essential oils movement.

The ‘Food Babe’: A Taste of Her Own Medicine

The ‘Food Babe’: A Taste of Her Own Medicine

by Mark Aaron Alsip
Skeptical Inquirer · Medical Misinformation · Volume 39.3

While “Food Babe” Vani Hari’s pseudoscience has been widely debunked by qualified doctors and scientists, a more sobering fact seems to have escaped everyone’s attention: one of America’s most notorious bloggers is earning sales commissions from products that contain the very same ingredients she says are dangerous.

WHO’s Strategy on Traditional and Complementary Medicine

WHO’s Strategy on Traditional and Complementary Medicine

by Thomas P.C. Dorlo, Willem Betz, and Cees N.M. Renckens
Skeptical Inquirer · Medical Misinformation · Volume 39.3

The World Health Organization once again advocates for implementing complementary and alternative medicine in national health services, jeopardizing global public health and evidence-based medicine.