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NASA Tries to Bomb Star Visitors

Psychic Vibrations

Robert Sheaffer

Volume 34.1, January / February 2010

NASA may have most people convinced that its purpose in crashing the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) into the Moon on October 9, 2009, was to look for ice in a permanently shaded crater near the Moon’s south pole. But well-known UFO expert Richard Boylan of Sacramento, California, isn’t fooled; he knows that it’s “a Cabal project to annihilate a Star Visitor colony living in a crater near the Moon’s South Pole.” Boylan, a former psychologist who lost his license over allegedly improper behavior, is a board member of a group called The Academy of Clinical Close Encounter Therapists. Boylan not only works with those who believe they are victims of UFO abduction but also detects and counsels “Star Kids” and adult “Star Seeds,” people who believe they have special advanced abilities and a special alien mission on Earth. His Web site, www.drboylan.com, helpfully provides a checklist for those who believe that they or their children may be Star-special. Answer “yes” to twenty or more of the questions, and your child is “absolutely a Star Kid.”

Boylan explains:

The Cabal within NASA know that there is a colony of Star Visitors living within Cabeus A Crater. The Cabal’s secret objective is to use the LCROSS and attached rocket stage to obliterate the Star Visitor settlement residing within that crater.... I note that the Cabal is indeed engaged in unlawful war crimes and attempting to position the United States, and by extension, all Earth nations, in an act of war against star civilizations. Since this is not a true act of the United States Government but a rogue act by Cabal infiltrators within NASA, then the official government of the United States, and by extension the United Nations, would repudiate this action as unlawful once its true intent becomes known.

To try to head off this disaster, Boylan attempted to send a message through unspecified special channels to warn President Obama and Vice President Biden, “who normally oversees the government’s Star Visitors programs.” Unfortunately, the message did not get through because it was intercepted by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who is a “Cabal asset.” So Boylan sent a telepathic message to Star Nations High Council, asking if they would like him to organize a “Joint Psychic Exercise [JPE] to redirect LCROSS and Centaur rocket away from the Moon.” Receiving a reply in the affirmative, Boylan announced the following: “Twenty days from now we will engage (along with Star Nations) in a Joint Psychic Exercise to divert the LCROSS space probe and accompanying Centaur rocket away from crashing into the Star Visitors lunar colony within Cabeus A Crater. That Joint Psychic Exercise will take place simultaneously globally on October 8 (the day before supposed impact).”

Boylan called this the “Joint Psychic Exercise to deflect and disintegrate LCROSS space probe and its Centaur booster rocket” and gave the hour in each time zone for his followers to perform their feats of psychic action-at-a-distance.

However, a week before the launch, NASA changed its mind about which crater to impact. NASA scientists decided that the main crater, Cabeas, was more likely to contain significant amounts of water, and they directed LCROSS and its Centaur rocket to the new target. So the energy from the future Joint Psychic Exercise probably went back in time, causing NASA to direct its impact away from the Star Nations visitors. Or else Boylan’s urgent message finally got through to Star-Visitor-Overseer Joe Biden, who averted an interplanetary war by moving the LCROSS target. But Boylan himself seems unaware of the re-targeting or at least did not mention it on his Web site.

Precisely at the predicted time, the Centaur rocket, followed quickly by LCROSS itself, both undeflected and undisintegrated, slammed into the lunar crater Cabeas at a speed of about 40 km/s. Nonetheless, Boylan proclaimed the exercise a success, claiming that the probe and rocket were “deflected” from the Moon and “disintegrated in space.” Boylan explained how he projected himself astrally through time and space and (still apparently unaware of the probes’ retargeting) “went out psychically to LCROSS and Centaur booster as they were streaming towards the Moon. Next I enwrapped LCROSS in a telekinetic force and redirected it onto a course to the left so it was aiming towards one Moon-diameter’s width left of the Moon’s left side. Then the same was done with the Centaur booster rocket.” But merely to deflect the objects was not enough:

I engaged first one, then the other, with strong dissolution energy to unbind the Strong Force bonds holding their atoms together as molecules. [That, however, is an electromagnetic bond, not a nuclear one.] Moving from top to bottom, I un-did the Strong Force bonds, causing the component materials of these space vehicles to come apart at the molecular level. This process also safely dismantled the advanced munitions which were secretly aboard these space vehicles... . This was confirmed this morning by Star Nations, whose members were also at work on these two space vehicles during our JPE, to assure thorough deflection and disintegration. Thus the star folks lunar colony within Cabeus A Crater is safe from overhead bombardment.

Perhaps this explains why no ground-based telescopes observed any dust ejected from the collision.


Attack of the Drones? Starting in 2007, pictures of weird, spindly shaped UFOs started to turn up in UFO Web sites and magazines, usually submitted anonymously. Looking like a cross between a wire basket and a ceiling fan, “drone UFOs” started popping up all over the place.

The first such photos supposedly came from a fellow in Bakersfield, California, known only as “Chad.” In May of 2007, he submitted a total of six drone UFO photos to the Coast-to-Coast AM Web site, which posted them. He wrote, “My wife and I were on a walk when we noticed a very large, very strange ‘craft’ in the sky.... The craft is almost completely silent and moves very quickly.... I see this thing very often.... It is almost totally silent but not quite. It makes kind of ‘crackling’ noises.... It moves almost like an insect.” The object in the photo had five protruding arms, one much longer than the others.

Before long, a second set of drone UFO photos was allegedly taken at Lake Tahoe near the Nevada-California line, submitted anonymously to the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) and posted on their Web site. This craft had four arms, two significantly longer than the others. Soon six more anonymous drone photos from Capitola, California, were posted on the Internet by a person calling himself “Rajman.” This one had some sort of “alien writing” on it. A few days later, somebody known only as “Stephen” produced three drone photographs supposedly taken at Big Basin Park, not far from Capitola. The object is somewhat distant, and details are hard to see. About ten days later, a guy named “Ty” submitted twelve drone photos, supposedly taken at Big Basin Park the same day as Stephen’s and seen by his cycling group. Ty’s photos are amazingly close-up, allowing one to see every gear, sprocket, and spike in clear detail. After that, a few more pictures trickled in from here and there, but the fad for photographing drone UFOs seemed to have run its course. Somebody calling himself “Isaac” wrote a letter explaining how he used to work on a classified project called “Caret” that utilized captured alien technology to produce antigravity. He also produced what he purports is a technical manual, portions of it heavily redacted, showing parts that seem to have come from a drone UFO.

In 2008, a woman in London who said she was with the “Open Minds Forum” contacted California private investigator T.K. Davis. She wanted to hire him to find out who photographed the drones, as thus far every photographer has only given a first name. She didn’t want to be identified, either. She had emailed Rajman with some questions, but he closed his e-mail account after only a brief reply. So Davis and his colleague Frankie Dixon headed to Capitola to identify the specific telephone pole seen in the photo. The whole affair is starting to sound like a Humphrey Bogart movie.

On September 10, 2009, the Telegraph of London published a strange photo with a story titled “UFO or Pterodactyl over Argentinian Lake? A Strange Object Photographed over a Lake in Argentina Has Been Described as Either a Flying Saucer or a Flying Dinosaur.” The somewhat blurry photo, taken with a cell phone, shows a round object with five arms or spikes protruding from it, causing anyone who has been watching the carnival described above to immediately exclaim, “It’s a drone!” The photo was taken by Rafael Pino (at least this man has a first and last name!) who says he was driving his truck when he spotted the object and stopped to snap three photos. However, one alert reader in Argentina wrote, “It does look like a windshield cracked by a rock.” An analysis of these photos on the blog Forgetomori (http://forgetomori.com) suggests that “indeed, the ‘UFO’ is apparently in the same perspective in all photos, as if it didn’t really move. Note that in the second photo, the line of horizon is tilted ... but the UFO’s rightmost ‘spike,’ which is actually a crack, is still parallel to it. So, a cracked windshield looks like a good and obvious explanation.” By the way, there’s a lot of interesting investigative material on Forgetomori, whose motto is “Extraordinary Claims, Ordinary Investigations.” But many of the investigations seem well beyond the “ordinary,” so I suggest you have a look.

Yet another photo of a spiky drone from the Netherlands was quickly identified by several readers as a “Waldorf box kite,” which indeed does have the same spiky shape. Of course, the clear and detailed, but anonymous, drone photos from California are not the result of cracked windshields or kites but probably are courtesy of Photoshop or similar software. In fact, some computer graphics whizzes have already produced impressive animated videos of drone UFOs. For one fine example, see the admittedly hoaxed video at www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBEYc5OUUtw. Seeing is no longer believing, if indeed it ever was.


Richard H. Hall, a UFOlogist of long standing, passed from the scene after succumbing to cancer on July 17 at the age of seventy-eight. Hall served in the U.S. Air Force and attended Tulane University before taking a job with the National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena (NICAP) in Washington, DC, in 1958. At that time, NICAP was the largest and most influential UFO group in the U.S. Hall eventually became NICAP’s assistant director, working under NICAP Director Maj. Donald E. Keyhoe (1897–1988), one of the founding fathers of contemporary UFOlogy, whose sensationalist magazine articles and books, such as Flying Saucers from Outer Space, helped create the public’s belief in alien visitors.

Hall is best known as the author of The UFO Evidence (1964), a compendium of carefully selected best cases in the NICAP files. Upon publication, the book was sent to every member of Congress in hopes of attracting interest in the UFO mystery. When Keyhoe was ousted from NICAP in 1969, Hall followed, leaving full-time UFOlogy to take jobs as a technical writer and editor. He remained active with other UFO groups such as MUFON and the Fund for UFO Research. He also wrote numerous published articles on other subjects, especially Civil War history.

Dick, as he was always known, was a strong supporter of the Extraterrestrial Hypothesis for UFOs and had a reputation for contentiousness. He was often feuding not only with skeptics but with many UFO believers. The few times I met him, Dick was polite but clearly had a very low tolerance for UFO skepticism. Like so many in the UFO field, he believed that the evidence was “out there” for anyone to see if only they would open their eyes. That his UFO Evidence falls far short of the requirements of science was something Dick Hall was unable to understand.

Robert Sheaffer

Robert Sheaffer's "Psychic Vibrations" column has appeared in the Skeptical Inquirer for the past thirty years. He is also author of UFO Sightings: The Evidence (Prometheus 1998). He blogs at www.badUFOs.com.