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Skeptical Inquirer — Volume 40.1

Volume 40.1

January/February 2016

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Pseudorelatos sobre el chupacabras

Pseudorelatos sobre el chupacabras

by Benjamin Radford, traducido por Alejandro Borgo – CFI/Argentina
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Online Extra

La mayoría de la gente da por sentado que el chupacabras, como sus hermanos Piegrande y Nessie, apareció hace décadas o siglos. Sin embargo, el origen de este misterioso vampiro bestial se remonta a un testigo portorriqueño que vio la película Species en 1995, en la que aparecía un monstruo casi idéntico.

Mistaken Memories of Vampires: Pseudohistories of the Chupacabra

Mistaken Memories of Vampires: Pseudohistories of the Chupacabra

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

As well-known monsters go, the chupacabra is of very recent vintage, first appearing in 1995. However, some writers have created pseudohistories and claimed a false antiquity for the Hispanic vampire beast. These examples provide a fascinating look at cryptozoological folklore in the making.

Deepak Chopra’s ‘Physics’

Deepak Chopra’s ‘Physics’

by Sadri Hassani
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

Deepak Chopra attempts to connect fundamental concepts of physics to consciousness and spirituality. He started (ab)using physics with his book Quantum Healing. But does he pass the first test of a true scientist: professional integrity?

Illusions of Memory

Illusions of Memory

by Elizabeth Loftus
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Commentary

These are remarks by psychologist and CSI Fellow Elizabeth Loftus accepting an honorary doctorate at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

The Brown Mountain Lights: Solved! (Again!)

The Brown Mountain Lights: Solved! (Again!)

by Joe Nickell
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Investigative Files

As with UFOs, some lights will remain unidentified—not because they are inherently mysterious but because they are just eyewitness reports or snapshots with so many variable factors.

The X-Files Effect? Research Suggests We Shouldn’t Worry so Much over the Hit TV Series

The X-Files Effect? Research Suggests We Shouldn’t Worry so Much over the Hit TV Series

by Matt Nisbet
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

The Science of Science Communication

These findings came with an important caveat: The relationship between TV viewing and belief was only significant among those viewers who reported prior personal experience with the paranormal.

The ‘Lie Detector’ Test Revisited: A Great Example of Junk Science

The ‘Lie Detector’ Test Revisited: A Great Example of Junk Science

by Morton E. Tavel
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

Although the polygraph can be useful in coercing confessions, it is based on scientifically implausible assumptions of accuracy and is biased against the innocent. The scientific community justly considers it pseudoscience, and it should be abandoned.

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Trends in Scientific Knowledge, Education, and Religion

by Charles S. Reichardt
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

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The Science of Meaning

by Gleb Tsipursky
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

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The Sixteenth European Skeptics Congress, London 2015

by Michael Heap and Chris French
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Conference Report

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The SkeptiCal Conference

by Susan Gerbic
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Conference Report

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Skepticism in Popular Music: The Art of Discourse

by Susan Gerbic
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Special Report

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Do We Really Want Science-Informed Candidates?

by Kendrick Frazier
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

From the Editor

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Hanging Out with Hangar 1

by Robert Sheaffer
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Psychic Vibrations

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Have You Seen the Toucan Man?

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Skeptical Inquiree

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Lincoln’s ‘Haunting’ Presence

by Joe Nickell
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Review

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Invasion of the Pod People

by Robert Sheaffer
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Review