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Creators of the Paranormal

by Joe Nickell
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

Feature

A handful of twentieth-century figures "created" the modern concept of the paranormal and its leading topics, transporting fantasy, myth, or speculation into a kind of believable "reality." Most proved to be a chimera.

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Dissociation and Paranormal Beliefs, Toward a Taxonomy of Belief in the Unreal

by Matthew J. Sharps, Schuyler W. Liao, and Megan R. Herrera
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

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Scientific Reasoning at the USAF Academy: An Examination into Titanium-Treated Necklaces

by Craig A. Foster, Christopher K, McClernon, and Richard F. Reich
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

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Stick It In Your Ear! How Not To Do Science

by Harriet Hall
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

Feature

Ear acupuncture claims to relieve sore throats. A new study seeming to support that idea is so poorly done that it provides a textbook example of how to distinguish between good and bad science.

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A Testament of Belief Masquerading as Science

by Michael J. Reynolds
Volume 40.3, May/June 2016

Feature

Need there be a conflict between science and religion? Francis S. Collins thinks not, but his "evidence for belief" disintegrates under scrutiny, revealing instead a personal testament of belief.

The ‘Lie Detector’ Test Revisted: A Great Example of Junk Science

The ‘Lie Detector’ Test Revisted: A Great Example of Junk Science

by Morton E. Tavel
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

Although the polygraph can be useful in coercing confessions, it is based on scientifically implausible assumptions of accuracy and is biased against the innocent. The scientific community justly considers it pseudoscience, and it should be abandoned.

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Skepticism and the Nature of the Mind

by Daniel A. Vogel
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

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Biological Race and the Problem of Human Diversity

by Kenneth W. Krause
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

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The Mote in Thy Brother’s Eye

by Thomas Gilovich and Lee Ross
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

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A Numerate Life

by John Allen Paulos
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

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Does the Scientific Method Have Biblical Origins?

by Brian Bolton
Volume 40.2, March/April 2016

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Trends in Scientific Knowledge, Education, and Religion

by Charles S. Reichardt
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

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The Science of Meaning

by Gleb Tsipursky
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

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Mistaken Memories of Vampires: Pseudohistories of the Chupacabra

Mistaken Memories of Vampires: Pseudohistories of the Chupacabra

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

As well-known monsters go, the chupacabra is of very recent vintage, first appearing in 1995. However, some writers have created pseudohistories and claimed a false antiquity for the Hispanic vampire beast. These examples provide a fascinating look at cryptozoological folklore in the making.

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Deepak Chopra’s ‘Physics’

Deepak Chopra’s ‘Physics’

by Sadri Hassani
Volume 40.1, January/February 2016

Feature

Deepak Chopra attempts to connect fundamental concepts of physics to consciousness and spirituality. He started (ab)using physics with his book Quantum Healing. But does he pass the first test of a true scientist: professional integrity?

‘Post-Materialist’ Science? A Smokescreen for Woo

‘Post-Materialist’ Science? A Smokescreen for Woo

by Sadri Hassani
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

Pseudoscience has been rapidly gaining ground in the past few decades. Dietary supplements and homeopathic preparations, advertised by the disgraced Dr. Oz and his ilk, now constitute a multi-billion-dollar industry.

The 1848 ‘Enormous Serpent’ of the Daedalus Identified

The 1848 ‘Enormous Serpent’ of the Daedalus Identified

by Gary J. Galbreath
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

A famous sea serpent sighting has been an enduring mystery 
of the sea since 1848. However, new information suggests a solution.

Encouraging Evidence-Free Enterprise: Business on a Bed of Sand

Encouraging Evidence-Free Enterprise: Business on a Bed of Sand

by Brian D. Engler and Eugenie V. Mielczarek
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

The former National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine’s use of two U.S. government grant programs for small businesses is examined and found to lend legitimacy to the lucrative business of non-evidence-based medicine.

A Brief History of Scientific Celebrity

A Brief History of Scientific Celebrity

by Declan Fahy
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

Science is personified by a handful of articulate, media-savvy scientists who stimulate new thinking, 
drive scientific controversies, enhance public understanding, mobilize social movements, 
and shape policy. To millions, these scientific celebrities are the public face of science.

Covert Cognition: My So-Called Near-Death Experience

Covert Cognition: My So-Called Near-Death Experience

by Stephanie Savage​
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

A skeptic sees no light at the end of the tunnel when she falls into a six-week coma and nearly dies.

ADVERLYING: Disliking Advertising from an Informed Perspective

ADVERLYING: Disliking Advertising from an Informed Perspective

by Steve Cuno
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

Some accusations levied against advertising are undeserved. But then, some are deserved, though perhaps not in ways you may have heard or assumed. Meanwhile, not a few bad apples engage in a heinous advertising tactic that goes largely unnoticed.

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Do We Really Want to Believe in UFOs?

by Klaus Brasch
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

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Treemonisha: Scott Joplin’s Skeptical Black Opera

by Bruce A. Thyer
Volume 39.4, July/August 2015

Feature

When Don’t the Highly Educated Believe in Evolution? The Bible Believers Effect

When Don’t the Highly Educated Believe in Evolution? The Bible Believers Effect

by Charles S. Reichardt and Ian A. Saari
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Feature

Among those who believe the Bible is the word of God, those with more formal education are less likely to believe in human evolution than those with less education.

Alien Lights? At Phoenix, Stephenville, and Elsewhere: A Postmortem

Alien Lights? At Phoenix, Stephenville, and Elsewhere: A Postmortem

by James McGaha and Joe Nickell
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Feature

Investigations show that famous nighttime “alien light” sightings were all due to objects in the sky, but not the extraterrestrial spacecraft UFO enthusiasts imagined.

Why Do People Believe in Gods?

Why Do People Believe in Gods?

by Gary M. Bakker
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Feature

… And Ghosts, Angels, Demons, Fairies, Goblins, and Other Imagined Conspiracies?

Crazy Beliefs, Sane Believers: Toward a Cognitive Psychology of Conspiracy Ideation

Crazy Beliefs, Sane Believers: Toward a Cognitive Psychology of Conspiracy Ideation

by Preston R. Bost
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Feature

Where do conspiracy beliefs come from? Recent behavioral research suggests that they do not reflect pathology or lazy thinking but may instead come from normal, rational minds.

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Evolution: The Big and the Small of It

by Edouard Harris and Jérémie Harris
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Feature

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Yes, But How Do You Explain This?

by Stephen Carey
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Feature

Defending Science-Based Medicine: 44 Doctor-Bashing Arguments ...and Their Rebuttals

Defending Science-Based Medicine: 44 Doctor-Bashing Arguments ...and Their Rebuttals

by Harriet Hall
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

Supporters of alternative medicine and purveyors of quack remedies love to criticize conventional medicine and science. They keep repeating the same tired arguments that are easily rebutted. This handy guide will help skeptics answer common criticisms from doctor-bashers.

Sweet Science of Seduction or Scam? Evaluating eHarmony

Sweet Science of Seduction or Scam? Evaluating eHarmony

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

The popular online dating site eHarmony claims that its matching methods are both successful and scientific. But a closer look at the evidence suggests otherwise.

Video Game Violence and Pseudoscience: Bad Science, Fear, and Politics

Video Game Violence and Pseudoscience: Bad Science, Fear, and Politics

by Christopher J. Ferguson
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

Research continues to find that violent video games play a negligible role in societal violence. But the politics of a culture war won’t let the idea go.

Dr. Phil and the Hummingbird

Dr. Phil and the Hummingbird

by Jim Underdown
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

A medium made a seemingly impressive guess about a hummingbird on a national television talk show. A follow-up investigation finds it not so striking after all—for the birds, in fact.

Some Popular Global Warming Factoids

by John Eades
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

Norman Mailer coined the word factoids to describe facts that have no existence before appearing in a magazine or newspaper, but once they do appear they are accepted without question. Some global warming deniers are especially fond of them.

Remembrance of Apocalypse Past: The Psychology of True Believers When Nothing Happens

Remembrance of Apocalypse Past: The Psychology of True Believers When Nothing Happens

by Matthew J. Sharps, Schuyler W. Liao, and Megan R. Herrera
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Feature

Research on belief in the 2012 “apocalypse” demonstrates that specific psychological processes contributed directly to the maintenance of paranormal apocalyptic beliefs, even after the apocalypse did not occur.

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Modern Geocentrism: A Case Study of Pseudoscience in Astronomy

by Matthew P. Wiesner
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Feature

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Flaw and Order: The Science and Mythology of Criminal Profiling

by Laurence Miller
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Feature

Josh Zepps with Ann Druyan: Cosmos, Carl Sagan, and Culture

Josh Zepps with Ann Druyan: Cosmos, Carl Sagan, and Culture

by Josh Zepps
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

We present a condensed version of an earlier interview about Ann Druyan’s experience with the first and the new Cosmos series by Josh Zepps for our Center for Inquiry’s Point of Inquiry podcast.

The Rhetoric of Extraordinary Claim

The Rhetoric of Extraordinary Claim

by Peter J. Marston
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

Although unfamiliar to many skeptics, rhetorical analysis can provide a useful complement to the traditional critical thinking approaches that comprise the “skeptic’s toolbox.”

An Introduction to Homeopathy

An Introduction to Homeopathy

by Harriet Hall
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

A brief guide to a popular alternative system of remedies based on a nineteenth-century concept that has no scientific validity.

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Kendrick Frazier Asks Ann Druyan about the New Cosmos

by Kendrick Frazier
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

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Runaway Hysteria: The Toyota Panic, with the Federal Government’s Seal of Approval

by Michael Fumento
Volume 38.5, September/October 2014

Feature

Mount Rainier: ‘Saucer Magnet’

Mount Rainier: ‘Saucer Magnet’

by James McGaha and Joe Nickell
Volume 38.3, May/June 2014

Feature

Mount Rainier isn’t just where seminal UFO figure Kenneth Arnold saw “flying saucers” in 1947; the majestic mountain actually plays a more direct role in saucerology.

Selling Pseudoscience: A Rent in the Fabric of American Medicine

Selling Pseudoscience: A Rent in the Fabric of American Medicine

by Eugenie V. Mielczarek and Brian D. Engler
Volume 38.3, May/June 2014

Feature

A study of federal funding advancing naturopathy, acupuncture, chiropractic, and energy healing as acceptable medical protocols finds troubling misuse of taxpayer dollars.

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Stop Heisenberg Abuse! Three Outrageous Misappropriations of Quantum Physics

by Dale DeBakcsy
Volume 38.3, May/June 2014

Feature

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UFOs and Cognitive Science: A Case Study

by Matthew J. Sharps
Volume 38.3, May/June 2014

Feature

Stanislaw Burzynski: Four Decades of an Unproven Cancer Cure

Stanislaw Burzynski: Four Decades of an Unproven Cancer Cure

by David H. Gorski
Volume 38.2, March/April 2014

Feature

The Houston doctor Stanislaw Burzynski has been using an unproven cancer cure, “antineoplastons,” for decades, but despite its lack of proven anticancer activity, he has still not been shut down. Here is a primer for skeptics on his career and claims.

Skeptic Activists Fighting for Burzynski’s Cancer Patients

Skeptic Activists Fighting for Burzynski’s Cancer Patients

by Robert Blaskiewicz
Volume 38.2, March/April 2014

Feature

A group of skeptical activists has been aggressively investigating and challenging the false claims of the Burzynski clinic and its dubious cancer treatments, presenting reliable information about them online. They even raised funds for a legitimate research hospital.

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What Is the Danger That Terrorists Will Attack the United States with a Nuclear or ‘Dirty’ Bomb?

by Richard E. Wackrow
Volume 38.2, March/April 2014

Feature

The Moon Was Full and Nothing Happened

The Moon Was Full and Nothing Happened

by I. W. Kelly, James Rotton, and Roger Culver
Volume 10.2, Winter 1985-86

Feature

A Review of Studies on the Moon and Human Behavior and Lunar Beliefs

Harun Yahya’s Islamic Creationism: What It Is and Isn’t

Harun Yahya’s Islamic Creationism: What It Is and Isn’t

by Stefano Bigliardi
Volume 38.1, January/February 2014

Feature

The works published under the name Harun Yahya promote “Islamic creationism.” A closer look at their internal logic reveals that their appeal lies in their capacity to mimic science.

When Big Evidence Isn’t: The Statistical Pitfalls of Dean Radin’s Supernormal

When Big Evidence Isn’t: The Statistical Pitfalls of Dean Radin’s Supernormal

by Dale DeBakcsy
Volume 38.1, January/February 2014

Feature

Dean Radin’s new book claims that the scientific evidence for supernormal human abilities is now overwhelming. Radin relies upon meta-analyses and misrepresentations of published results to produce outlandish confidence numbers that work against the very belief he is trying to foster.

Demonology: A Study of What Is Not

Demonology: A Study of What Is Not

by Stanley Stepanic
Volume 38.1, January/February 2014

Feature

Demonology is one of the most misused terms in English, particularly by those relating the phrase to the occult. But what is it?

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When Does a Human Life Begin?

by Elie A. Shneour
Volume 38.1, January/February 2014

Feature

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Six Signs of Scientism: Part 2

by Susan Haack
Volume 38.1, January/February 2014

Feature

Losing Our Minds in the Age of Brain Science

Losing Our Minds in the Age of Brain Science

by Sally Satel and Scott O. Lilienfeld
Volume 37.6, November/December 2013

Feature

Neuroscience and its new brain imaging tools are great achievements of modern science. But they are vulnerable to being oversold by the media, some overzealous scientists, and neuroentrepreneurs.

Why Being Human Makes Evolution Hard to Understand

Why Being Human Makes Evolution Hard to Understand

by Cameron M. Smith
Volume 37.6, November/December 2013

Feature

Our difficulty accepting evolution isn’t just because some religions oppose it or that it is complicated—it isn’t. The problem may be a result of how our minds work.

The Valentich Disappearance: Another UFO Cold Case Solved

The Valentich Disappearance: Another UFO Cold Case Solved

by James McGaha and Joe Nickell
Volume 37.6, November/December 2013

Feature

What did he see? The missing piece of the puzzle in a strange ‘UFO’ case involving the crash of a young pilot off Australia has been identified.

The Jersey Devil: The Real Story

The Jersey Devil: The Real Story

by Brian Regal
Volume 37.6, November/December 2013

Feature

The story of the Jersey Devil has become layered with myths and variations, obscuring the original events that gave rise to it. Not surprising considering the story comes from colonial-era political intrigue, Quaker religious infighting, and a future Founding Father.

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Six Signs of Scientism: Part 1

by Susan Haack
Volume 37.6, November/December 2013

Feature

Stardust, Smoke, and Mirrors: The Myth of the Mad Genius

Stardust, Smoke, and Mirrors: The Myth of the Mad Genius

by Judith Schlesinger
Volume 37.5, September/October 2013

Feature

The myth of the mad genius began with a misinterpretation of Plato’s “divine madness” and has since gathered support and credibility because of public fascination, media distortion, and enthusiastic pseudoscience.

The Psychic Defective Revisited: Years Later, Sylvia Browne’s Accuracy Remains Dismal

The Psychic Defective Revisited: Years Later, Sylvia Browne’s Accuracy Remains Dismal

by Ryan Shaffer
Volume 37.5, September/October 2013

Feature

An update of our “Psychic Defective” analysis examines developments in eleven cases Sylvia Browne made predictions about, explores a new reading, and scrutinizes her other failed predictions about the papacy and American politics.

Lost Lessons of the Strangling Angel

Lost Lessons of the Strangling Angel

by LaRae Meadows
Volume 37.5, September/October 2013

Feature

Europe’s diphtheria outbreaks in the 1940s provide a sobering context for modern anti-vaccination claims.

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How News about ESP Research Shapes Audience Beliefs

by Paul R. Brewer
Volume 37.5, September/October 2013

Feature

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Electrocuting Parasites: Cutting Edge Pseudoscientific Technology

by Thomas Patterson
Volume 37.5, September/October 2013

Feature

The Chelyabinsk Event of February 15, 2013

The Chelyabinsk Event of February 15, 2013

by David Morrison, Alan Harris, and Mark Boslough
Volume 37.4, July/August 2013

Feature

On February 15, 2013, the million inhabitants of the central Russian city of Chelyabinsk experienced a half-megaton explosion from a disintegrating space rock. What happened, and how did the people of Chelyabinsk react?

Down the Garden Path: Faulty Thinking and Self-Delusion

by Harriet Hall
Volume 37.4, July/August 2013

Feature

A Navy neurologist’s credulous venture into acupuncture advocacy serves as a useful case study. Here are twelve mistakes he made rambling down the garden path of self-delusion.

The Queen Mary Is Not Haunted (But I Understand Why You Think She Is)

The Queen Mary Is Not Haunted (But I Understand Why You Think She Is)

by John Champion
Volume 37.4, July/August 2013

Feature

The RMS Queen Mary, a ship of enormous historical import, has been transformed into a roadside attraction whose owners profit off the allure of “ghosts.” Her glorious factual history has been brushed aside in a bid to pander to eager ghost-hunting tourists who aren’t thinking critically about the claims.

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Investigating Plagiarism in New Age Books

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 37.4, July/August 2013

Feature

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The ‘Psychology Is Science, Not Witchcraft’ Campaign

by Tomasz Witkowski and Maciej Zatonski
Volume 37.4, July/August 2013

Feature

New Information Surfaces on ‘World’s Best Lake Monster Photo,’ Raising Questions

New Information Surfaces on ‘World’s Best Lake Monster Photo,’ Raising Questions

by Robert E. Bartholomew
Volume 37.3, May/June 2013

Feature

The famous “Mansi photo” of the Lake Champlain monster has been held up for decades as strong proof for cryptozoology—the so-called best evidence for the existence of a hidden animal. Yet, newly uncovered documents reveal troubling questions about the photo and the circumstances surrounding it.

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Nurturing Non-Science: Startling Concepts in the Education of Physicians

by Eugenie V. Mielczarek and Brian D. Engler
Volume 37.3, May/June 2013

Feature

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Climate Change Denial in the Classroom

by Christopher Hassall, Chris A. Hebbern, and Carley J. Centen
Volume 37.3, May/June 2013

Feature

Treatise on Invisible Beings

Treatise on Invisible Beings

by Joe Nickell and James McGaha
Volume 37.2, March/April 2013

Feature

Allegedly invisible entities—popular belief notwithstanding—are indistinguishable from imaginary beings.

An Indian Test of Indian Astrology

An Indian Test of Indian Astrology

by Jayant V. Narlikar
Volume 37.2, March/April 2013

Feature

Indian astrologers claim they can tell a person’s intelligence from his or her horoscope. But twenty-seven astrologers failed to perform better than chance when given forty horoscopes of intellectually bright subjects and mentally handicapped subjects.

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The Elberfeld Horses

by Stefano Vezzani
Volume 37.2, March/April 2013

Feature

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Understanding Believers’ Cognitive Dissonance

by James Walker
Volume 37.2, March/April 2013

Feature

It’s the End of the World and They Don’t Feel Fine: The Psychology of December 21, 2012

It’s the End of the World and They Don’t Feel Fine: The Psychology of December 21, 2012

by Matthew J. Sharps, Schuyler W. Liao, and Megan R. Herrera
Volume 37.1, January/February 2013

Feature

Cognitive science research on belief in the 2012 “apocalypse” demonstrates that dissociative processes contribute directly to this belief through reduction of the “feature-intensive” cognitive processing that would engender appropriate skepticism.

Indignation Is Not Righteous

by Gary Longsine and Peter Boghossian
Volume 37.1, January/February 2013

Feature

Appeals to righteous indignation or sanctity—which attempt to shield ideas from contemplation, discussion, investigation, or criticism—are common, impede rational discourse, and should be recognized as logical fallacies.

Monsters and Dragons and Dinosaurs, Oh My: Creationist Interpretations of Beowulf

Monsters and Dragons and Dinosaurs, Oh My: Creationist Interpretations of Beowulf

by Eve Siebert
Volume 37.1, January/February 2013

Feature

There is no field of inquiry that young-Earth creationists can’t distort. In the area of literary and linguistic studies, they misinterpret, misrepresent, and mistranslate Beowulf to fit their agenda.

The Secret Life of J. Allen Hynek

The Secret Life of J. Allen Hynek

by John Franch
Volume 37.1, January/February 2013

Feature

According to legend, the astronomer J. Allen Hynek was a skeptic before becoming an outspoken UFOlogist, but is the legend true? This article takes a look at Hynek’s unusual life and career.

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Mystics, Mycobacterium, and the Gospel of Matthew

by C.A. Porter
Volume 37.1, January/February 2013

Feature

Phrenology and the Grand Delusion of Experience

Phrenology and the Grand Delusion of Experience

by Geoffrey Dean
Volume 36.6, November/December 2012

Feature

In the nineteenth century, phrenology was hugely influential despite being totally invalid. Its history shows why we must be skeptical of any belief based solely on experience.

Homeopathy: A Critique of Current Clinical Research

Homeopathy: A Critique of Current Clinical Research

by Edzard Ernst
Volume 36.6, November/December 2012

Feature

An evaluation of the clinical research by the group that has published most of the papers in homeopathy, 2005–2010, finds numerous flaws in the design, conduct, and reporting along with a tendency to overinterpret weak data.

The Pseudoscience of Live Blood Cell Analysis

The Pseudoscience of Live Blood Cell Analysis

by Thomas Patterson
Volume 36.6, November/December 2012

Feature

Of the many aspects of alternative medicine, one of the most bizarre is live blood cell analysis. This unapproved blood test supposedly identifies nutritional deficiencies and other nebulous conditions.

Faith Healing and Skepticism in Pakistan: Challenges and Instability

Faith Healing and Skepticism in Pakistan: Challenges and Instability

by Ryan Shaffer
Volume 36.6, November/December 2012

Feature

With the rise of Islamic extremism in Pakistan, the country not only has to protect people from fraudulent healers but also has the challenge of protecting these fraudsters from violence.

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A Golden Age of Harmony? Misrepresenting Science and History in the 1001 Inventions Exhibit

by Taner Edis and Sonja Brentjes
Volume 36.6, November/December 2012

Feature

Skepticism in the Video Box

Skepticism in the Video Box

by Christian Walters
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

Skepticism is not just books and talks anymore. With the popularity of social media services, skeptical discussion and inquiry has moved beyond the written word and the podium. If you like your critical thinking in the form of a quick demonstration that can be as short as a music video, YouTube has you covered.

A Warm Twist on a ‘Cold Reading’: A Conversation with Damon Martin

A Warm Twist on a ‘Cold Reading’: A Conversation with Damon Martin

by Matthew A. Kacar Jr.
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

For as long as there have been people claiming to be mediums, there have been people like composer Damon Martin to call them out. His latest Traumatosis album, Cold Reading, takes the listener on a journey that details the deceptive techniques used by people who claim an ability to talk with the dead.

Art, Mysteries, and Context

Art, Mysteries, and Context

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

In my books and workshops on scientific paranormal investigation, I discuss how best to conceptualize a mystery: basically, an event out of context. A live dolphin lying on a Manhattan sidewalk is a mystery; that same dolphin in a tank at an aquarium is not.

Surly-Ramic’s Amy Davis Roth

Surly-Ramic’s Amy Davis Roth

by Amy Davis Roth
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

I design jewelry that advocates education and science and that celebrates the brave, emerging society of freethinkers that I find myself a part of. It’s nice to be able to carry around a small piece of art that represents skepticism and the rational ideals that are helping to make this world a better place.

Skeptic Trumps: A Satirical Skeptic Card Game

Skeptic Trumps: A Satirical Skeptic Card Game

by Tim Farley
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

The skeptical community’s growth has led to many unanticipated creative projects, particularly online. One such project is Skeptic Top Trumps, a virtual deck of playing cards featuring caricatures of popular skeptics.

In the Key of Type: A Conversation with Marian Call

In the Key of Type: A Conversation with Marian Call

by Kylie Sturgess
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

Art and skepticism do complement each other wonderfully in her work, but Call has slightly a different perspective: “In the end, I feel I’m firmly on the skeptic side, I believe. But I don’t see picking a side as my role as an artist. I see communication as my role.” Kylie Sturgess interviewed Call about her music and where skepticism harmonizes with art.

Skewed Skepticism: Bizarro Piraro

Skewed Skepticism: Bizarro Piraro

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

A conversation with award-winning cartoonist, fine artist, and stand-up comedian Dan Piraro.

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Art and Skepticism Introduction

by Benjamin Radford
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

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Nighthawks State of Mind

by Jeremiah Moss
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

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Science and Art: Complementary Disciplines

by Joe Nickell
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

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Confirmation Bias and Art

by Samuel McNerney
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

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XKCD: A Perfect Marriage of Snark and Skepticism

by CSI Staff
Volume 36.5, September/October 2012

Feature

Neurologic Illness or Hysteria? A Mysterious Twitching Outbreak

Neurologic Illness or Hysteria? A Mysterious Twitching Outbreak

by Joe Nickell
Volume 36.4, July/August 2012

Feature

Six cases were reported, then twelve, then fifteen and counting as the story captured attention across the United States and beyond. I twice visited Le Roy on behalf of the Skeptical Inquirer, to talk with parents and others involved, visit relevant sites, and otherwise investigate this strange outbreak.