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Skeptical Inquirer

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Skeptical Inquirer is the official journal of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. It is published by the Center for Inquiry in association with the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. Six times per year Skeptical Inquirer publishes critical scientific evaluations of all manner of controversial and extraordinary claims, including but not limited to paranormal and fringe-science matters, and informed discussion of all relevant issues. In addition to news, articles, book reviews, and investigations on a wide variety of topics, Skeptical Inquirer has a stellar stable of regular columnists including Joe Nickell (“Investigative Files”), Massimo Polidoro (“Notes on a Strange World”), Massimo Pigluicci (“Thinking About Science”), Robert Sheaffer (“Psychic Vibrations”), and SI managing editor Benjamin Radford's reader-driven (“The Skeptical Inquiree”). Yale University neurologist Steven Novella, M.D., founder of the New England Skeptical Society and executive editor of the Science-Based Medicine blog, contributes a new "The Science of Medicine" column, and contributing editor Kenneth W. Krause adds a regular science column, "ScienceWatch."

The Bermuda Triangle Mystery Delusion: Looking Back after Forty Years

The Bermuda Triangle Mystery Delusion: Looking Back after Forty Years

by Larry Kusche
Volume 39.6, November/December 2015

The man who solved the Bermuda Triangle “mystery” looks back after four decades on his investigations into the missing flight that started it all and the shoddy research, gullibility, and distortions that created this mystery.

A Protopian View of Moral Progress

A Protopian View of Moral Progress

by Daniel Grassam
Volume 39.6, November/December 2015

Review

A Review of The Moral Arc: How Science and Reason Lead Humanity Toward Truth, Justice, and Freedom by Michael Shermer

The Consensus on Anthropogenic Global Warming

The Consensus on Anthropogenic Global Warming

by James Lawrence Powell
Volume 39.6, November/December 2015

In 2013–2014, only four of 69,604 publishing climate scientists rejected anthropogenic global warming. The consensus on anthropogenic global warming is not 97 percent, as is widely claimed; it is above 99.9 percent.

On Her Majesty’s Secret Saucers

On Her Majesty’s Secret Saucers

by Robert Sheaffer
Volume 39.6, November/December 2015

Review

A Review of How UFO's Conquered the World by David Clarke

‘Reason for Change’: Quacks and Cranks, GMOs and Climate, Science and Philosophy

‘Reason for Change’: Quacks and Cranks, GMOs and Climate, Science and Philosophy

by Kendrick Frazier
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Conference Report

CFI Conference Covers It All

‘Post-Materialist’ Science? A Smokescreen for Woo

‘Post-Materialist’ Science? A Smokescreen for Woo

by Sadri Hassani
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

Pseudoscience has been rapidly gaining ground in the past few decades. Dietary supplements and homeopathic preparations, advertised by the disgraced Dr. Oz and his ilk, now constitute a multi-billion-dollar industry.

The 1848 ‘Enormous Serpent’ of the Daedalus Identified

The 1848 ‘Enormous Serpent’ of the Daedalus Identified

by Gary J. Galbreath
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

A famous sea serpent sighting has been an enduring mystery 
of the sea since 1848. However, new information suggests a solution.

Encouraging Evidence-Free Enterprise: Business on a Bed of Sand

Encouraging Evidence-Free Enterprise: Business on a Bed of Sand

by Brian D. Engler and Eugenie V. Mielczarek
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Feature

The former National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine’s use of two U.S. government grant programs for small businesses is examined and found to lend legitimacy to the lucrative business of non-evidence-based medicine.

Is Wikipedia a Conspiracy? Common Myths Explained

Is Wikipedia a Conspiracy? Common Myths Explained

by Susan Gerbic
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Forum

Allow me to set the record straight. First off, Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia that is trying to be the repository of all knowledge; it is not Tumbler or Reddit or some other social network. Wikipedia has rules. Some of them are open to interpretation a bit, but for the most part the rules are discussed within the community of editors and usually enforced evenly.

The Black Madonna: A Folkloristic and Iconographic Investigation

The Black Madonna: A Folkloristic and Iconographic Investigation

by Joe Nickell
Volume 39.5, September/October 2015

Investigative Files

One of the most famous of true icons (traditional religious panel paintings) is the so-called Black Madonna of Czestochowa, Poland (Figure 1). Its notoriety was boosted when, following his election to the papacy, the “Polish Pope” John Paul II prayed before it on a visit in 1979. For an international History Channel series, Miracles Decoded, I was asked to look into the icon’s origins. I

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