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Skeptical Inquirer

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Skeptical Inquirer is the official journal of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. It is published by the Center for Inquiry in association with the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. Six times per year Skeptical Inquirer publishes critical scientific evaluations of all manner of controversial and extraordinary claims, including but not limited to paranormal and fringe-science matters, and informed discussion of all relevant issues. In addition to news, articles, book reviews, and investigations on a wide variety of topics, Skeptical Inquirer has a stellar stable of regular columnists including Joe Nickell (“Investigative Files”), Massimo Polidoro (“Notes on a Strange World”), Massimo Pigluicci (“Thinking About Science”), Robert Sheaffer (“Psychic Vibrations”), and SI managing editor Benjamin Radford's reader-driven (“The Skeptical Inquiree”). Yale University neurologist Steven Novella, M.D., founder of the New England Skeptical Society and executive editor of the Science-Based Medicine blog, contributes a new "The Science of Medicine" column, and contributing editor Kenneth W. Krause adds a regular science column, "ScienceWatch."

The New Pope Saints

by Joe Nickell
Volume 39.2, March/April 2015

Investigative Files

On April 27, 2014, two former popes—John XXIII (Angelo Roncalli, 1881–1963) and John Paul II (Karol Wojtyla, 1920–2005)—were made saints of the Roman Catholic Church. But how are saints created?

Why Do People Believe in Gods?

Why Do People Believe in Gods?

by Gary M. Bakker
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Article

… And Ghosts, Angels, Demons, Fairies, Goblins, and Other Imagined Conspiracies?

Crazy Beliefs, Sane Believers: Toward a Cognitive Psychology of Conspiracy Ideation

Crazy Beliefs, Sane Believers: Toward a Cognitive Psychology of Conspiracy Ideation

by Preston R. Bost
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Article

Where do conspiracy beliefs come from? Recent behavioral research suggests that they do not reflect pathology or lazy thinking but may instead come from normal, rational minds.

Sylvia Browne’s FBI File: Examining Her Alleged Detective Work and a Federal Criminal Investigation

Sylvia Browne’s FBI File: Examining Her Alleged Detective Work and a Federal Criminal Investigation

by Ryan Shaffer
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Special Report

Recently obtained FBI files shatter Sylvia Browne’s insinuation that she had a relationship with federal law enforcement and show that the only interest the agency had in Browne was investigating her for fraud.

Monster Catfish: Investigating a Whopper

Monster Catfish: Investigating a Whopper

by Joe Nickell
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Investigative Files

There are different versions—folklore at work—regarding the origins of both the giant fish and the old photo. Some say the picture is genuine, while others insist that it is not.

The Trent UFO Photos—‘Best’ of All Time—Finally Busted?

The Trent UFO Photos—‘Best’ of All Time—Finally Busted?

by Robert Sheaffer
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Psychic Vibrations

Once again, farmer Paul Trent’s famous UFO photos from McMin­nville, Oregon, are a hot topic in UFOlogy.

The Amazing Randi’s Most Extraordinary Escape, Part 2

The Amazing Randi’s Most Extraordinary Escape, Part 2

by Massimo Polidoro
Volume 39.1, January/February 2015

Notes on a Strange World

So, how did The Amazing Randi escape not only from the cell that kept him a prisoner but also from the building of the police station in Valleyfield Quebec? Here is the ingenious solution devised by Randi.

Defending Science-Based Medicine: 44 Doctor-Bashing Arguments ...and Their Rebuttals

Defending Science-Based Medicine: 44 Doctor-Bashing Arguments ...and Their Rebuttals

by Harriet Hall
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Article

Supporters of alternative medicine and purveyors of quack remedies love to criticize conventional medicine and science. They keep repeating the same tired arguments that are easily rebutted. This handy guide will help skeptics answer common criticisms from doctor-bashers.

Sweet Science of Seduction or Scam? Evaluating eHarmony

Sweet Science of Seduction or Scam? Evaluating eHarmony

by Ben Radford
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Article

The popular online dating site eHarmony claims that its matching methods are both successful and scientific. But a closer look at the evidence suggests otherwise.

Video Game Violence and Pseudoscience: Bad Science, Fear, and Politics

Video Game Violence and Pseudoscience: Bad Science, Fear, and Politics

by Christopher J. Ferguson
Volume 38.6, November/December 2014

Article

Research continues to find that violent video games play a negligible role in societal violence. But the politics of a culture war won’t let the idea go.

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