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Tamar Wilner

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Tamar Wilner is a Dallas-based journalist, researcher, and communications graduate student, specializing in the study of misinformation and science communication. She's a frequent contributor to the Columbia Journalism Review and a consultant on the Fact-Checking Project at the American Press Institute. You can find her at www.tamarwilner.com and on Twitter at @tamarwilner.

How to Talk about Conflict of Interest

Media Mind
October 5, 2016
How to Talk about Conflict of Interest

Most medical meta-studies are either unnecessary, misleading, or wrong

Attack of the 12-Foot Rats: Why Bad Math Runs Rampant

Media Mind
June 15, 2016
Attack of the 12-Foot Rats: Why Bad Math Runs Rampant

Another reason why we don’t fact-check math: there’s a tendency to ascribe truthiness to a claim with numbers in it.

Five Things I Learned Writing about Stanislaw Burzynski

Media Mind
March 10, 2016
Five Things I Learned Writing about Stanislaw Burzynski

“Newsweek published my feature about the cancer doctor Stanislaw Burzynski, who’s facing potential license revocation... And I got a reminder of how hard it is to write about controversial health issues.”

Trump-Rage: How Political Anger Clouds Our Thinking

Media Mind
January 4, 2016
Trump-Rage: How Political Anger Clouds Our Thinking

The solution is not to seek some Platonic ideal of pure rationality, which is neither achievable nor desirable. Anger, managed correctly, can drive ethical action. The key is to focus on the informational content of those anger states and find the most effective ways to fashion and spread correctives.

Science Surveyor and the Quest for Consensus

Media Mind
November 17, 2015
Science Surveyor and the Quest for Consensus

Why do journalists insist on trumpeting the findings of the latest, anomalous study-ignoring the weight of all the evidence that came before?

Online Tools for Skeptical Fact Checking

Media Mind
August 24, 2015
Online Tools for Skeptical Fact Checking

While we’re arguably awash in more misinformation than ever before, online media have also enabled tools and sources that help us evaluate dubious claims.

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