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Robert E. Bartholomew

Robert Bartholomew teaches history at Botany Down Secondary College in Auckland, New Zealand. He is the author of The Untold History of Champ: A Social History of America’s Loch Ness Monster (December 2012) by SUNY Press. Email: rbartholomew@yahoo.com.

New Information Surfaces on ‘World’s Best Lake Monster Photo,’ Raising Questions

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 37.3, May/June 2013

Article
New Information Surfaces on ‘World’s Best Lake Monster Photo,’ Raising Questions

The famous “Mansi photo” of the Lake Champlain monster has been held up for decades as strong proof for cryptozoology—the so-called best evidence for the existence of a hidden animal. Yet, newly uncovered documents reveal troubling questions about the photo and the circumstances surrounding it.

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‘Mystery Illness’ in Western New York: Is Social Networking Spreading Mass Hysteria?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 36.4, July/August 2012

Article

The recent outbreak of twitching, facial tics, and garbled speech—symptoms of a form of conversion disorder—at a school in Western New York may signal a growing trend in the United States.

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Mass Hysteria at Starpoint High

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 31.1, January / February 2007

Article

Though mass hysteria is alive and well in the twenty-first century, it remains an unpopular diagnosis.

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Tsunami Rumors Cause Ongoing Waves of Fear

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 29.4, July / August 2005

News & Comment

Months after the receding waters from the tsunami of December 26, 2004, rumors of more killer waves continue to disrupt lives.

Rethinking the Dancing Mania

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 24.4, July / August 2000

Article
Rethinking the Dancing Mania

Medieval dance frenzies have long been regarded as a classic example of stress-induced mental disorder...

The Martian Panic Sixty Years Later: What Have We Learned?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 22.6, November / December 1998

Article

The ‘War of the Worlds’ panic happened sixty years ago, but its lessons are as relevant today as back then.

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