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Massimo Pigliucci

Massimo Pigliucci is professor of philosophy at the City University of New York–Lehman College, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and author of Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science from Bunk. His essays can be found at rationallyspeaking.org.

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On the Moon

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 33.4, July / August 2009

News & Comment

There is nothing like new facts to add some excitement to supposedly established theories.

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Hard and Soft Science: Physics vs. Psychology

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 33.3, May / June 2009

Thinking About Science

It turns out that the replicability of findings in psychology is no worse than that of findings in particle physics.

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The Tree of Life

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 33.2, March / April 2009

Thinking About Science

Darwin famously drew only one figure in The Origin of Species, which was published 150 years ago...

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Experimental Philosophy, an Oxymoron?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 33.1, January / February 2009

Thinking About Science

Is it inconveivable, for instance, for an ethical philosopher to write a paper in that field as if he had never heard of...

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The Brain on Justice

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 32.5, September / October 2008

Thinking About Science

Justice, fairness and the efficient distribution of resources do not seem at first the sort of topics that should interest...

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Alternative Science

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 32.4, July / August 2008

Thinking About Science

Theories and hypotheses are the outcome of creative thinking, and creative thinking requires imagination, not just knowledge.

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Creationist Peer Review

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 32.3, May / June 2008

Thinking About Science

Arguing, teaching, and doing research means that one accepts the rule of rational, evidence-based discourse...

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Toward a Consilience of Sciences and Humanities?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 32.2, March / April 2008

Thinking About Science

In 1998, biologist Edward O. Wilson published a controversial book titled Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge...

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Is Intelligent Design Creationism?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 32.1, January / February 2008

Thinking About Science

The fossils produced by the paleontologist make a compelling case because they are of the appropriate morphology...

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Beyond Selfish Genes

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 31.6, November / December 2007

Thinking About Science

Richard Dawkins' classic book, The Selfish Gene (1976), presented to the public the astonishing idea that...

The Trouble with Memetics

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 31.5, September / October 2007

Thinking About Science

A meme, according to the by-now-standard dictionary definition, is "an element of a culture or system of behavior that may be...

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Is Dawkins Deluded? When Scientists Talk About Religion

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 31.4, July / August 2007

Thinking About Science

By some accounts, 2006 was the year atheists struck back. Three books in particular made headlines across the world...

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Can There Be a Science of Free Will?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 31.3, May / June 2007

Thinking About Science

A splendid article by Dennis Overbye in The New York Times gave me the impetus to talk about...

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Is There Such a Thing as Macroevolution?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 31.2, March / April 2007

Thinking About Science

Even creationists make progress.

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Evolutionary Epistemology, Anyone

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 31.1, January / February 2007

Thinking About Science

Wittgenstein wrote that "Darwin's theory has no more to do with philosophy than any other hypothesis in natural science."

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The Neuro-philosophy of Regred

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 30.6, November / December 2006

Thinking About Science

For millennia, the study of the mind and the relationship between reason and emotions was the exclusive domain of philosophy.

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One More Take on Reductionism vs. Holism

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 30.5, September / October 2006

Thinking About Science

Do you think that nature is characterized by complex systems that interact with each other and whose properties are not...

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When Philosophy Matters

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 30.4, July / August 2006

Thinking About Science

Philosophy is often accused of being out of touch with reality, the esoteric pursuit of a vanishing academic elite that...

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Is Physics Turning into Philosophy?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 30.3, May / June 2006

Thinking About Science

Physics is, by most people's—especially physicists'—accounts, the queen of the sciences.

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Is Evolutionary Psychology a Pseudoscience?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 30.2, March / April 2006

Thinking About Science

Evolutionary psychology is the most current incarnation of what started out as sociobiology, a branch of evolutionary theory...

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Planet X and the Issue of Definitions in Science

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 30.1, January / February 2006

Thinking About Science

Planet X, the long-hypothesized tenth member of the solar system, has finally been discovered by a group of astronomers...

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Just the Facts, Ma’am: Empirical vs. Rationalist Approaches to Understanding

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 29.6, November / December 2005

Thinking About Science

Skeptics tend to be empiricists. They want the facts. Indeed, it is this emphasis on empirically verifiable statements that...

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The Power and Perils of Metaphors in Science

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 29.5, September / October 2005

Thinking About Science

Humans apparently cannot avoid thinking, at least occasionally, by images and parallels to already known situations.

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Are the Historical Sciences Sciences?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 29.4, July / August 2005

Thinking About Science

Are historical sciences somehow inferior to experimental ones? This attitude, sometimes referred to as "physics envy..."

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The So-called Gaia Hypothesis

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 29.3, May / June 2005

Thinking About Science

Is Earth a living organism? Broadly speaking, this is the chief claim of a family of theories often referred to as "Gaia."

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Do Extraordinary Claims Really Require Extraordinary Evidence?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 29.2, March / April 2005

Thinking About Science

Carl Sagan had a rare gift for making clear rather abstruse ideas.

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Piltdown and How Science Really Works

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 29.1, January / February 2005

Thinking About Science

When one debates creationists, one is bound to run up against the infamous Piltdown forgery. This is the case of an alleged...

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And the Mechanism Is ...

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 28.6, November / December 2004

Thinking About Science

Why do people fall in love? This ageless question has seen attempts at resolution by minds of the caliber of Aristotle and...

Design Yes, Intelligent No: A Critique of Intelligent Design Theory and Neocreationism

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 25.5, September / October 2001

Article
Design Yes, Intelligent No: A Critique of Intelligent Design Theory and Neocreationism

A new brand of creationism has appeared on the scene in the last few years.

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