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Joe Nickell

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Joe Nickell, Ph.D., is Senior Research Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI) and "Investigative Files" Columnist for Skeptical Inquirer. A former stage magician, private investigator, and teacher, he is author of numerous books, including Inquest on the Shroud of Turin (1998), Pen, Ink and Evidence (2003), Unsolved History (2005) and Adventures in Paranormal Investigation (2007). He has appeared in many television documentaries and has been profiled in The New Yorker and on NBC's Today Show. His personal website is at joenickell.com.

Cartoon: Obamacare Repeal

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
July 21, 2017
Cartoon: Obamacare Repeal

Artwork by Joe Nickell.

Eclectic Medicine

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
July 7, 2017

In nineteenth century America, a number of what today are called “alternative” medical practices—“magnetic healing” (hypnosis), homeopathy, and eclecticism, among others—vied with each other and with regular or “old school” medicine—i.e., allopathy, today’s science-based medicine.

 

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JonBenet Murder Mystery Solved? (Not by Psychics)

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 41.4, July/August 2017

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Murder by Darkness: Does Mammoth Cave’s Specter Harbor a Secret?

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 41.4, July/August 2017

Investigative Files

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The Bigfoot Obsession

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 41.4, July/August 2017

Review

Barker’s Nerve and Bone Liniment

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
June 19, 2017
Barker’s Nerve and Bone Liniment

Barker’s Nerve and Bone Liniment was a proprietary medicine introduced by Thomas Barker in Philadelphia in 1859. It was intended for both man and beast.

 

Multipurpose “Florida Water”

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
June 1, 2017
Multipurpose “Florida Water”

“Florida Water”—popular through most of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth—was neither water nor a product of Florida. It had a surprising number of uses, medicinal and otherwise.

 

The New Zealand Moa: From Extinct Bird to Cryptid

Skeptical Briefs Volume 27.1, Spring 2017

Investigative Files
The New Zealand Moa: From Extinct Bird to Cryptid

Cryptids are of two types: either (1) unknown species, such as Bigfoot or at one time the Mountain Gorilla; or (2) known species that supposedly become extinct but may have survived and could be rediscovered.

“Globster” Mysteries

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
May 22, 2017

Cryptozoologists call them “globsters”—great decaying masses usually seen when they wash ashore somewhere. The unidentified carcasses are typically called “sea monsters”—until science determines their true identity. Such a creature—a 50-foot leviathan—appeared on an Indonesian island beach in early May 2017. The rotting corpse was first thought to be that of a giant squid (the “Kraken” of sea lore).

 

“Mouth Elixir”: Bell-shaped Dr. Bell Bottle

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
May 11, 2017
“Mouth Elixir”: Bell-shaped Dr. Bell Bottle

This distinctive bell-shaped bottle (see photo) is embossed on its bottom, “DR. V. C. BELL’S MOUTH ELIXIR.” What on earth was that?

 

Some Queensland Mysteries

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 41.3, May/June 2017

Investigative Files
Some Queensland Mysteries

Strange mysteries may be found almost anywhere, but they seem especially plentiful and interesting in Australia.

Televangelist Hinn Investigated—Again

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
May 5, 2017

Benny Hinn—the televangelist who talks with God and knocks people down by merely pointing at them—is being investigated for fraud and tax evasion, following a raid executed by a search warrant on April 26, 2017. I am not surprised. He is full of tricks.

 

“The Lost City of Z”: A Nickell-odeon Review

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
April 28, 2017

The Lost City of Z is the story of an alleged indigenous city in Brazil’s Amazon, its name given by British soldier, surveyor, and explorer Col. Percy Fawcett who sought to prove its reality. To understand Fawcett’s quest, we must see it in the context of such myths generally, which—pursued from the fifteenth century—helped lead to the development of archaeology.

 

Steller’s Sea Ape:
 Identifying an Eighteenth-Century Cryptid

Skeptical Briefs Volume 26.4, Winter 2016/2017

Investigative Files

Since its appearance in 1741, a mysterious creature has remained controversial—a so-called “sea monkey” that puzzled naturalist Georg Wilhelm Steller.

Ghost “Orbs” at the Witch’s Barn

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
April 24, 2017
Ghost “Orbs” at the Witch’s Barn

Many ghost hunters insist that “orbs”—strange balls of light that mysteriously appear in their photos—are a form of “spirit energy.” If so, they seem nowhere more evident than at a Rhode Island barn where, according to some sources, two persons were hanged, including a witch named Bathsheba. She was central to the horror film, The Conjuring, reportedly based on the case files of the infamous Ed and Lorraine Warren, self-styled “demonologist” and “clairvoyant” who made a career of scaring people with made-up demons.

 

Miracle Tableau: Knock, Ireland, 1879

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 41.2, March/April 2017

Investigative Files
Miracle Tableau: Knock, Ireland, 1879

The ability to see pictures in random forms—as in clouds, tea leaves, and inkblots—is known as pareidolia... Some publicized examples I have made pilgrimages to examine include the face of Jesus in the skillet burns of a tortilla…

“The Conjuring” Double Bombshell

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
April 11, 2017

The author of the book that launched The Conjuring franchise (two main horror films and spin-offs based on the work of two notorious paranormal investigators) has now launched a double bombshell. He is suing the movies’ producers for allegedly violating his rights, while also stating that central claims in the movies are bogus.

 

Joe Nickell Receives Distinguished Service Award

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
April 5, 2017
Joe Nickell Receives Distinguished Service Award

Thanks to the committee for Buffalo’s annual Science Exploration Day who — on the event day of March 22, 2017, at the University of Buffalo — honored me with the Distinguished Service Award. The following page appeared in the event booklet:

Claims of Chi: Besting a Tai Chi Master

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 41.1, January/February 2017

Investigative Files
Claims of Chi: Besting a Tai Chi Master

Tai chi is a shortened form of taiji quan, “Supreme ultimate boxing.” Conceived centuries ago as a martial art, it is now also practiced—as “Taoist tai chi”—as an exercise technique…

A Brief Biography of “Magnetic Healer” H.N. Wheelock

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
March 28, 2017

As presented elsewhere (Nickell 2017), I acquired for my collection a trade card of nineteenth-century “Magnetic Healer” H.N. Wheelock. To learn more about him, I researched various sources, including an authoritative Wheelock genealogy (Sullivan 2017). CFI Libraries Director Tim Binga greatly assisted with this project, tracking Wheelock through federal and state censuses and other records. Here is what we discovered.

 

Rare Trade Card of “Magnetic Healer”

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
March 24, 2017
Rare Trade Card of “Magnetic Healer”

The Victorian trade card (a forerunner of the later business card), pictured here, is graced by the engraved portrait and facsimile signature of H.N. Wheelock. He is described on the reverse as a “Mental and Vital Magnetic Healer”—that is, one who treated both mind and body. “WILL THOU BE MADE WHOLE?” he asks.

 

Unique Quassia Cup: Made Its Own Medicine!

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
March 10, 2017
Unique Quassia Cup: Made Its Own Medicine!

The cures were in the wood of this nineteenth-century medicinal goblet. It supposedly turned ordinary water into a powerful tonic for treating fever and numerous other ailments.

 

RIDDLEculous XIV

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
March 1, 2017

More funny riddles from a skeptical view.

Dispelling Demons: Detective Work at The Conjuring House

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 40.6, November/December 2016

Investigative Files
Dispelling Demons: Detective Work at The Conjuring House

I analyzed the Perrons’ claims of demonic activity and showed that they were consistent with the effects of strong winds, misperceptions, schoolgirl pranks, vivid dreams, simple suggestion, role-playing, and other factors.

“Otto’s Cure” for Consumption, Etc.

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
February 17, 2017
“Otto’s Cure” for Consumption, Etc.

“Otto’s Cure for Throat & Lungs” was allegedly effective for diseases including whooping cough and consumption (tuberculosis). (There were many such bogus consumption cures.)

 

Ghost in the Window: At Toronto’s Colborne Lodge

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
February 10, 2017

According to many sources, Colborne Lodge at Toronto’s High Park (where I visited in 1973) is still the residence of the lady of the house, Jemima. Illness confined her for many years to her upstairs bedroom, until she died in 1877 and was buried on the property. “To this day,” states Dennis William Hauck in his The International Directory of Haunted Places (2000, 155), “her apparition is seen staring out that same upstairs master bedroom window, looking down at her iron-fenced gravesite and massive monument.” Hauck goes on to explain that she was the wife of Sir John Colborne, lieutenant-governor of Upper Canada, but he is mistaken.

 

“Hidden Figures”: A Nickell-odeon Review

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
February 1, 2017

Hidden Figures is an important, must-see movie. It tells the inspiring story of three African-American women who rise above the sexism and racism of the 1950s and 1960s to work as “human computers” at NASA, helping to launch Americans into space.

 

Cartoon: Immigrant/Refugee Ban

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
January 31, 2017
Cartoon: Immigrant/Refugee Ban

Artwork by Joe Nickell.

St. Jacobs Oil: New Acquisition

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
January 24, 2017
St. Jacobs Oil: New Acquisition

My recent acquisition of another St. Jacobs Oil liniment bottle warrants this update. My earlier blog (St. Jacob’s Oil, January 8, 2014) told how German immigrant August Vogeler (1819–1908) came to America and founded a patent-medicine business by 1845; after 1878 he and his son Charles were selling “ST. JACOBS OEL” (sic, using German spelling). I only described their early bottle but showed a photo of a later one.

 

Relic Madness

Free Thinking (centerforinquiry.net)
January 19, 2017

The mania for holy relics—in Catholicism objects once connected with the body of a saint—stems from belief that a relic is imbued with miraculous power including supernatural healings. Not surprisingly, this superstition has led to many excesses.

 

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