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The Committee for Skeptical Inquiry

The Committee for Skeptical Inquiry promotes science and scientific inquiry, critical thinking, science education, and the use of reason in examining important issues. It encourages the critical investigation of controversial or extraordinary claims from a responsible, scientific point of view and disseminates factual information about the results of such inquiries to the scientific community, the media, and the public.

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 41.3 —
May/June 2017

Skeptical Inquirer Volume 41.3 Cover

Articles by:

  • Benjamin Radford
  • Bertha Vazquez
  • Glenn Branch
  • Harriet Hall
  • James Randi
  • Joe Nickell
  • Kendrick Frazier
  • Massimo Polidoro
  • Matt Nisbet
  • Stuart Vyse
  • and more!

Latest Articles & News

George Cherrie’s 
Dark Tales

George Cherrie’s 
Dark Tales

by Benjamin Radford
Skeptical Briefs · Volume 26.4

It’s a good lesson for skeptics to question all extraordinary claims—not only from those with whom we may disagree or who may hold a different worldview, but also those whom we consider friends.

TIES Weekly Update–April 25, 2017

TIES Weekly Update–April 25, 2017

by Bertha Vazquez
Special Articles · TIES
April 25, 2017

An update from the Teacher Institute for Evolutionary Science.

Still ‘Amazing’: A Conversation with James Randi

Still ‘Amazing’: A Conversation with James Randi

by Kendrick Frazier
Skeptical Inquirer · Interview · Volume 41.2

I took up being Harry Houdini, though I never claimed to be him. As a matter of fact, during my career I broke a couple of his records.

Cómo superar a un Maestro de Tai Chi

Cómo superar a un Maestro de Tai Chi

by Joe Nickell, translated by Alejandro Borgo
Skeptical Inquirer · Investigative Files · Volume 41.1

Tai chi es una abreviatura de taiji quan, “boxeo máximo supremo”. Concebido hace siglos como un arte marcial, ahora también se practica —“Tai chi taoísta”— como técnica de ejercicios.

Steller’s Sea Ape:
 Identifying an Eighteenth-Century Cryptid

by Joe Nickell
Skeptical Briefs · Investigative Files · Volume 26.4

Since its appearance in 1741, a mysterious creature has remained controversial—a so-called “sea monkey” that puzzled naturalist Georg Wilhelm Steller.

Miracle Tableau: Knock, Ireland, 1879

Miracle Tableau: Knock, Ireland, 1879

by Joe Nickell
Skeptical Inquirer · Investigative Files · Volume 41.2

The ability to see pictures in random forms—as in clouds, tea leaves, and inkblots—is known as pareidolia... Some publicized examples I have made pilgrimages to examine include the face of Jesus in the skillet burns of a tortilla…